Pregnancy & smoking — The Bump
1st Trimester

Pregnancy & smoking

So, I didn't find anywhere in the guidelines that this could not be discussed and I also didn't find any other thread that discusses it. I am a smoker.. very sad to say so. And when I found out I was pregnant a few days ago, my worst fear was quitting because I was afraid of the stress it .at have on my body and my new beautiful zygote. I am 4 weeks and 4 days today, I have severely cut down on my smoking, as in one a day maybe two. I read that as long as you quit within the first 3 months, your chances of birth defects dramatically decline. Any other mommies out there having the same issue? I know women. That smoke the entire pregnancy but I don't plan on doing so, and trying to find helpful tips and tricks on how to deal with the cravings, cut down even more or even not feel so bad about it. Anyone else in the same boat?
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Re: Pregnancy & smoking

  • Cutting back to one or two a day is far better than smoking a pack a day (not that you did.) But if you can quit completely, definitely do that! 

    Baby 1 - 10/2010 | Baby 2 - 8/2012 | Baby 3 - 6/2014 | Baby 4 - EDD 8/2016 - MC 12-27-2015 | Baby 5 - : 9/2016

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  • Someone needs to post the picture of the black placenta. That is motivation enough to quit.

    **** Formerly Snoflakes4eva****

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  • So, I didn't find anywhere in the guidelines that this could not be discussed and I also didn't find any other thread that discusses it. I am a smoker.. very sad to say so. And when I found out I was pregnant a few days ago, my worst fear was quitting because I was afraid of the stress it .at have on my body and my new beautiful zygote. I am 4 weeks and 4 days today, I have severely cut down on my smoking, as in one a day maybe two. I read that as long as you quit within the first 3 months, your chances of birth defects dramatically decline. Any other mommies out there having the same issue? I know women. That smoke the entire pregnancy but I don't plan on doing so, and trying to find helpful tips and tricks on how to deal with the cravings, cut down even more or even not feel so bad about it. Anyone else in the same boat?

    Smoking is one of the worst things that you can do while pregnant. Please speak with your doctor about the steps you need to take in order to quit completely. Even smoking one or two a day can still cause harm to your baby- some of which may be irreversible.



    bbiutmcphlindsayleigh1989
  • this has actually been discussed a few times so I'm surprised you weren't able to find anything. 

    anyways, definitely try to quit completely. the stress of quitting my affect your child a tiny bit, but smoking throughout pregnancy would be worse, right? you can always speak with your doctor about this. guaranteed they have resources & options to help women who smoke & become pregnant. good luck!
  • I mean I plan on quitting well before the first tri is over! Like in a week or two I plan on being done, and yes went from almost a pack a day. I've talked to er doctors that said the stress is pretty bad on yourself as well as your baby when it comes to quitting. I don't need to feel like a terrible person, it's life. And I'm trying as hard as possible, trying! And will talk to my obgyn, but as for now at only 4 weeks I will strive to be done by mid 5 weeks, thank you all for suggestions!!!! Helps so much :-) 
    lindsayleigh1989
  • Someone needs to post the picture of the black placenta. That is motivation enough to quit.
    Not sure if you used to smoke but I'm actually pretty proud of myself for cutting back to 1 or 2 and not a pack right when I found out I was pregnant, I will get there, I know I will. But it's much harder for some people than others. If you did smoke, congrats for quitting because it's not an easy task.
    lindsayleigh1989Bigboobsmcgee

  • kyraaD said:
    this has actually been discussed a few times so I'm surprised you weren't able to find anything. 

    anyways, definitely try to quit completely. the stress of quitting my affect your child a tiny bit, but smoking throughout pregnancy would be worse, right? you can always speak with your doctor about this. guaranteed they have resources & options to help women who smoke & become pregnant. good luck!
    Can you link me? Because I looked pretty far back
    lindsayleigh1989
  • Smoking is selfish. Every time you light up, you force your baby too. Your likely to MC. stop now. Smoking causes many issues including birth defects. I don't care what your going through, think of the baby. You already know the answer. Don't justify cutting down as progress. It's not. 

  • kyraaD said:
    this has actually been discussed a few times so I'm surprised you weren't able to find anything. 

    anyways, definitely try to quit completely. the stress of quitting my affect your child a tiny bit, but smoking throughout pregnancy would be worse, right? you can always speak with your doctor about this. guaranteed they have resources & options to help women who smoke & become pregnant. good luck!
    Can you link me? Because I looked pretty far back
    i totally would but i am on mobile :( 
    did you search the 2nd Tri board as well? i think they might have been brought up on that board.
    babymamamegs
  • Glow360 said:
    Smoking is selfish. Every time you light up, you force your baby too. Your likely to MC. stop now. Smoking causes many issues including birth defects. I don't care what your going through, think of the baby. You already know the answer. Don't justify cutting down as progress. It's not. 
    ... Telling someone they're likely to miscarry due to smoking is not only false, but it's also extremely insensitive. I agree that smoking causes defects, problems, etc, but a MC is going to happen regardless of what sorts of outside factors the mother may have caused.
    Thank you @WinchestertoPittsburgh, I agree whole heartedly. MC is caused because of chromosomal defects, me smoking would not likely contribute much to it. I know it's not okay and I'm trying to quit cold turkey it's just so hard that I don't know what to do. I thought the stress of quitting was more than cutting back but it seems I have mistaken but that's why I posted this! Thank you so much ladies for the advice, it helps more than you know
    lindsayleigh1989PugsandKissesmsuzannah

  • kyraaD said:

    kyraaD said:
    this has actually been discussed a few times so I'm surprised you weren't able to find anything. 

    anyways, definitely try to quit completely. the stress of quitting my affect your child a tiny bit, but smoking throughout pregnancy would be worse, right? you can always speak with your doctor about this. guaranteed they have resources & options to help women who smoke & become pregnant. good luck!
    Can you link me? Because I looked pretty far back
    i totally would but i am on mobile :( 
    did you search the 2nd Tri board as well? i think they might have been brought up on that board.
    Same! No I didn't check and didn't even think to! Thank you 

  • kyraaD said:

    Glow360 said:
    Smoking is selfish. Every time you light up, you force your baby too. Your likely to MC. stop now. Smoking causes many issues including birth defects. I don't care what your going through, think of the baby. You already know the answer. Don't justify cutting down as progress. It's not. 
    cutting back significantly is actually progress.. i have a feeling you have never struggled with any kind of addiction before. 
    No I have not, cigarettes is the only addiction I have ever known and I wish that I would have never picked it up but it happened :/

  • kyraaD said:

    Glow360 said:
    Smoking is selfish. Every time you light up, you force your baby too. Your likely to MC. stop now. Smoking causes many issues including birth defects. I don't care what your going through, think of the baby. You already know the answer. Don't justify cutting down as progress. It's not. 
    cutting back significantly is actually progress.. i have a feeling you have never struggled with any kind of addiction before. 
    No I have not, cigarettes is the only addiction I have ever known and I wish that I would have never picked it up but it happened :/
    @babymamamegs oh, i wasn't directing that towards you! i was directing it towards @Glow360 who gave you a pretty insensitive comment IMO. 
    babymamamegslindsayleigh1989izza2sonbonsbun
  • I can say she's likely to MC smoking. It's the facts. I never came up with it. Anybody that lives in America has enough common sense by now too know from all the research, to not smoke or drink while pregnant. It's just a given, sadly a little tiny baby is suffering right now. i don't support any womans habit that willingly is harming an unborn baby. Just quit. Do the right thing. 
  • @babymamamegs are you connected with a bmb yet ? If not I suggest you join yours as they can offer more support then on the 1st tri board 
    Bigboobsmcgee
  • Op, just ignore her ignorant statements, and continue to do the best you can by quitting asap.
    Me 28 DH 30
    Married May 16th, 2015
    EDD July 1st


    July16 May siggy challenge "May the Force be with you"

    lindsayleigh1989MamaBishbabymamamegs
  • @babymamamegs are you connected with a bmb yet ? If not I suggest you join yours as they can offer more support then on the 1st tri board 
    Like October babies? Yes I just wasnt sure which one would be better to post in, but still lurking around in that one!  :)
    lindsayleigh1989
  • OP definitely seek support from your OB and other resources in your area.  I live near a university and medical school and was contacted by them to participate in a study about supporting moms who smoke.  I don't smoke, so didn't qualify, but you may find resources in places you didn't think of initially.  Don't feel like you need to do this on your own!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Me: 29 & Husband: 36                                                         
    Married: October 2014
    NTNP: April 2015 - June 2015
    M/C: June 2015
    TTC #1 since September 2015
    BFP: 11/9/15 - EDD: 7/24/16
    babymamamegs
  • I'm glad you are taking steps in the right direction, be proud of that and keep up the good work! Don't listen to unsupportive people with no helpful advice! You are doing the best you can and I'm sure will continue trying to cut out smoking. 

    Have you you talked to your dr's office? Sometimes there are support groups for quitting. Good luck!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     Rainbow baby Savannah born 5.13.16 at 30 weeks    
     ♥ 
    Baby Cadence born still 3.24.15 at 28 weeks 

            
    lindsayleigh1989PugsandKisses
  • MamaBishMamaBish
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    edited February 2016
    Glow360 said:
    Smoking is selfish. Every time you light up, you force your baby too. Your likely to MC. stop now. Smoking causes many issues including birth defects. I don't care what your going through, think of the baby. You already know the answer. Don't justify cutting down as progress. It's not. 
    This is not helpful. She is asking for encouragement, not a guilt trip!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     Rainbow baby Savannah born 5.13.16 at 30 weeks    
     ♥ 
    Baby Cadence born still 3.24.15 at 28 weeks 

            
    lindsayleigh1989PugsandKissesecwk
  • edited February 2016
    @Glow360 time for an apology since not only were you incredibly rude and awful to the OP you were most importantly very wrong time for you to read this post as it very much relevant to you!

    eta: qbf
    Nerdchild said:
    Alright, I took a 'challenge accepted' stance to discussions of smoking and miscarriage in this thread.  Here are a few abstracts (and links to articles) when you do a google scholar search for peer-reviewed articles post 2012 (because, come on, to stay accurate it's best to go recent/relevant). I bolded for emphasis. These were the only semi-relevant articles I found within the first 5 pages.  I should note that many articles, upon closer review, would briefly discuss smoking and miscarriage risk in a methods sections as having little or no correlation, and therefore were not addressed in the discussion and conclusions portions.

    Results Of the 417 participants, the prevalence of maternal and paternal smoking was 26.3% and 30.7%, respectively, and 13.4% of mothers were exposed to their partner’s smoke. One in three (n = 134, 32.1%) had a confirmed miscarriage at follow-up. Miscarriage was not associated with maternal smoking (30.6% for non-smokers versus 32.4% for smokers; P = 0.737) or paternal smoking (31.2% for non-smokers versus 32.8% for smokers; P = 0.763). A higher proportion of women exposed to their partner’s smoke experienced miscarriage (44.2% vs. 29.9%; Odds ratio=1.86, 95% CI=1.03–3.38; P = 0.038). The association remained even after adjustment for the mother’s own smoking (Adjusted odds ratio=2.22, 95% CI=1.12–4.40; P = 0.022).

    http://jech.bmj.com/content/68/Suppl_1/A44.1.abstract


    Result(s)

    After adjustment for confounding factors, the following were independently associated with increased risk: history of miscarriage, repeated induced abortion, working night shifts, and frequent staying up late. Vitamin supplementation and regular physical activity reduced the risk of miscarriage. We did not find paternal age, alcohol consumption, or smoking status to be linked with early miscarriage.

    http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00151-4/abstract?cc=y=


    And because I need to add this one for good measure, I have bolded multiple parts I find relevant to understanding this article, followed by my comments in brackets.

    Abstract

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to characterize the relationship between smoking and miscarriage  {This means 'we looked at a huge group of other peoples' data.  We did not go out, recruit, control, and observe our own participants} . We searched the PubMed database (1956–August 31, 2011) {Holy shit, really?  You couldn't find any more recent data sets?} using keywords and conducted manual reference searches of included articles and reports of the US Surgeon General. The full text of 1,706 articles was reviewed, and 98 articles that examined the association between active or passive smoking and miscarriage were included in the meta-analysis. {Uhhh....what?  Cherry picking your data much?  Who the hell okay'd this for publication?!} Data were abstracted by 2 reviewers. Any active smoking was associated with increased risk of miscarriage (summary relative risk ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.30; n = 50 studies), and this risk was greater when the smoking exposure was specifically defined as during the pregnancy in which miscarriage risk was measured (summary relative risk ratio = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.44; n = 25 studies). The risk of miscarriage increased with the amount smoked (1% increase in relative risk per cigarette smoked per day). Secondhand smoke exposure during pregnancy increased the risk of miscarriage by 11% (95% CI: 0.95, 1.31; n = 17 studies). Biases in study publication, design, and analysis did not significantly affect the results. This finding strengthens the evidence that women should not smoke while pregnant, and all women of reproductive age should be warned that smoking increases the risk of miscarriage.

    http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/179/7/807.short

     
    For those of you who have made it this far in my post, thank you for indulging my tendency to actually look into the freaking research.


    TLDR; Out of the recent articles that explicitly discuss the association between smoking and miscarriage, there is no positive correlation.  Many other articles briefly mention smoking and miscarriage in their methods sections, but are not noted here because they also find no positive correlation and don't even bother to mention smoking and miscarriage in their discussion, results and analysis, or conclusion sections.  There is one random article that discusses the cherry-picked, fucking ancient data of a whole bunch of other people and that does find a positive correlation between miscarriage and smoking.  Most of the people I know who are involved in research and publication (which is kind of my goddamned job, thanks) would never let this kind of article through editorial or peer-review. 


    So, OP, talk to your doctor about how to quit quickly and successfully, good luck on quitting, and on behalf of your baby thank you for understanding that this is an issue that totally needs to be addressed.  Smoking is one hell of a habit to kick, but the payoff of improved health outcomes is totally worth it. 

    To anyone who wants to talk facts, please be prepared with some solid back-up, and try not to be an insensitive jerk about it in the process.



    SparkySunshinebabymamamegs
  • Nerdchild said:
    Alright, I took a 'challenge accepted' stance to discussions of smoking and miscarriage in this thread.  Here are a few abstracts (and links to articles) when you do a google scholar search for peer-reviewed articles post 2012 (because, come on, to stay accurate it's best to go recent/relevant). I bolded for emphasis. These were the only semi-relevant articles I found within the first 5 pages.  I should note that many articles, upon closer review, would briefly discuss smoking and miscarriage risk in a methods sections as having little or no correlation, and therefore were not addressed in the discussion and conclusions portions.

    Results Of the 417 participants, the prevalence of maternal and paternal smoking was 26.3% and 30.7%, respectively, and 13.4% of mothers were exposed to their partner’s smoke. One in three (n = 134, 32.1%) had a confirmed miscarriage at follow-up. Miscarriage was not associated with maternal smoking (30.6% for non-smokers versus 32.4% for smokers; P = 0.737) or paternal smoking (31.2% for non-smokers versus 32.8% for smokers; P = 0.763). A higher proportion of women exposed to their partner’s smoke experienced miscarriage (44.2% vs. 29.9%; Odds ratio=1.86, 95% CI=1.03–3.38; P = 0.038). The association remained even after adjustment for the mother’s own smoking (Adjusted odds ratio=2.22, 95% CI=1.12–4.40; P = 0.022).

    http://jech.bmj.com/content/68/Suppl_1/A44.1.abstract


    Result(s)

    After adjustment for confounding factors, the following were independently associated with increased risk: history of miscarriage, repeated induced abortion, working night shifts, and frequent staying up late. Vitamin supplementation and regular physical activity reduced the risk of miscarriage. We did not find paternal age, alcohol consumption, or smoking status to be linked with early miscarriage.

    http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00151-4/abstract?cc=y=


    And because I need to add this one for good measure, I have bolded multiple parts I find relevant to understanding this article, followed by my comments in brackets.

    Abstract

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to characterize the relationship between smoking and miscarriage  {This means 'we looked at a huge group of other peoples' data.  We did not go out, recruit, control, and observe our own participants} . We searched the PubMed database (1956–August 31, 2011) {Holy shit, really?  You couldn't find any more recent data sets?} using keywords and conducted manual reference searches of included articles and reports of the US Surgeon General. The full text of 1,706 articles was reviewed, and 98 articles that examined the association between active or passive smoking and miscarriage were included in the meta-analysis. {Uhhh....what?  Cherry picking your data much?  Who the hell okay'd this for publication?!} Data were abstracted by 2 reviewers. Any active smoking was associated with increased risk of miscarriage (summary relative risk ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.30; n = 50 studies), and this risk was greater when the smoking exposure was specifically defined as during the pregnancy in which miscarriage risk was measured (summary relative risk ratio = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.44; n = 25 studies). The risk of miscarriage increased with the amount smoked (1% increase in relative risk per cigarette smoked per day). Secondhand smoke exposure during pregnancy increased the risk of miscarriage by 11% (95% CI: 0.95, 1.31; n = 17 studies). Biases in study publication, design, and analysis did not significantly affect the results. This finding strengthens the evidence that women should not smoke while pregnant, and all women of reproductive age should be warned that smoking increases the risk of miscarriage.

    http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/179/7/807.short

     
    For those of you who have made it this far in my post, thank you for indulging my tendency to actually look into the freaking research.


    TLDR; Out of the recent articles that explicitly discuss the association between smoking and miscarriage, there is no positive correlation.  Many other articles briefly mention smoking and miscarriage in their methods sections, but are not noted here because they also find no positive correlation and don't even bother to mention smoking and miscarriage in their discussion, results and analysis, or conclusion sections.  There is one random article that discusses the cherry-picked, fucking ancient data of a whole bunch of other people and that does find a positive correlation between miscarriage and smoking.  Most of the people I know who are involved in research and publication (which is kind of my goddamned job, thanks) would never let this kind of article through editorial or peer-review. 


    So, OP, talk to your doctor about how to quit quickly and successfully, good luck on quitting, and on behalf of your baby thank you for understanding that this is an issue that totally needs to be addressed.  Smoking is one hell of a habit to kick, but the payoff of improved health outcomes is totally worth it. 

    To anyone who wants to talk facts, please be prepared with some solid back-up, and try not to be an insensitive jerk about it in the process.



    QFP

    Little boy due July 31st 2016

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