Meteformin, when did you stop — The Bump
Pregnant after IF

Meteformin, when did you stop

Did anyone take meteformin throughout their whole pregnancy? Did it prevent gestational diabetes? Did you stop taking it after the first trimester? I have PCOS and had gestational diabetes with my first and my doctor wants me to stop the meteformin at 12 weeks but I'm worried. If anyone has a story it would be helpful!

Re: Meteformin, when did you stop

  • My RE had me stop taking metformin at 12 weeks but I was only on it as kind of a last ditch effort to see if it made a difference for an FET - so there wasn't any real clinical reason for me being on it in the first place. Sorry this probably isn't that helpful!
  • I have PCOS and my RE had me stop metformin at 14 weeks. I have had my glucose test and passed. 
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  • I was on metformin because of insulin resistance so there was a clinical reason for me to be on it besides infertility. I was promptly switched out of metformin at 8 weeks to insulin by my endocrinologist because there is no long-term safety data with metformin. And apparently metformin isn’t as effective in dealing with gestational diabetes compared to insulin.
    Me: 41  DH: 46
    Unexplained infertility/AMA, polycystic ovaries, insulin resistance
    FET#1(July 2017): eSET of first of 4 PGS-normal embryos, DS born 3/30/2018
    FET#2(Oct/Nov 2019): eSET  
  • I have "borderline PCOS" and stopped Metformin at 12 weeks as well. I asked the midwife if it was true that it prevented gestational diabetes and she said there is limited evidence of that.



  • Thanks for everyone. I feel better about stopping at 12 weeks.
  • hottietoddyhottietoddy
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    edited February 2018
    Hi there, I have PCOS and I am going to continue Metformin through entire pregnancy.  It has been a very complicated process for me. I was on metformin before I got pregnant and both times as soon as I got pregnant my blood sugar started going up immediately.  I've been on insulin since about 5 weeks. The insulin is challenging to manage IMO and because it's such a delicate balance I plan to just stay the course I'm on and not change.  I had an allergy to Levimir and now on second type called Humulin N.  Insulin doses change frequently and sticking hurts. Plus there is a learning curve on administering it.  They told me wrong place to do it  in my thigh and my bs dropped to 38.  Was awful and sweated  like crazy and almost passed out, was very scary.  Before you go off metformin, you may want to be prepared and have insulin on hand and be checking blood sugars because my ob said it is the transition from metformin to insulin that can cause issues.  My Endo said it is ok and has had several patients continue through all three trimester and be fine.  I've been to three Endos in last year and 1 said that she has seen people have mmc after going off in second trimester. Then they will have second pregnancy and doctor will keep them on it the whole time second time. Don't mean to scare you. There are limited studies on effect of metformin and it passes through placenta to the baby. Insulin does not pass to the baby.  My ob also read study that children can have less risk of childhood obesity when metformin is taken throughout pregnancy.  That's everything I know!
  • @hottietoddy thanks for the info. I will be getting an early glucose test at 12 weeks before I go off meteformin. 
  • marimariimarimarii
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    member
    edited February 2018
    @hottietoddy I also didn't take metformin at all my first pregnancy not even the first trimester and didn't need insulin well into 32 weeks. Do you think that makes a difference? 
  • Hmmm maybe....why are you on it this time? My Endo also said that women need less insulin weeks 10-15.  So what I would do is get your glucose test while still on metformin which will probably be fine (bc you are on metformin) But ask them to give you blood sugar monitoring kit and insulin so you are prepared and can monitor.  Test your fasting and 1-2 times a day 2 hours after meals. Then if your blood sugar creeps up you can adjust and start some insulin.  If I were you I'd also start GD diet 15 carbs per snack and 45 per meal. That might keep your bs down and you off insulin until week 32 again. 
  • @hottietoddy the RE put me on it last March to help with PCOS symptoms. I'm not sure if it helped since my period never did become regular and I still needed to take meds to help me ovulate. Did you have diabetes before pregnancy or does yours only develop while pregnant?
  • Before pregnant I went off birth control and then my hormones went bonkers and I was pre- diabetic on and off- basically elevated A1-C numbers.  I was diagnosed with PCOS and insulin resistance.  I ovulate but only some months out of the year and not regularily.  It took me 2 years on metformin and Progesterone to regulate my period.  I got pregnant naturally and then had mmc.  I think it's because they didn't put me on enough Progesterone but could have just been inevitable as well.   2nd time started taking more metformin 1000mg and did clomid to ovulate so could move more quickly and be sure to get pregnant. Worked well first round.  Metformin was enough to keep A1-C down prior to pregnancy, but as soon as got pregnant bs went up again.   I have the kind of PCOS where I get my period and don't stop bleeding. I ended up in hospital after first mmc and had another bought of 6 months straight bleeding about a year prior.  So....yeah it's been a bumpy road for me.  Also doctors are just now starting to really study and understand PCOS.  I've been to several doctors and cross referenced info to get to my care plan. 
  • I think the key is checking your bs it is really the only way to know if all is ok. Also diet change is key too. Don't get me wrong I hate both of these things.  They put me on low carb diet prior to pregnancy to help too. I hate testing bs but I like knowing and piece of mind. I hate insulin, but nice to have power to control. You get used to it and the initial anxiety and learning curve is the hardest. 
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