I need help — The Bump
Special Needs

I need help

I am at my wits end and our OT didn't have any good suggestions either.

 Has anyone had to deal with head banging? DS has always been a head banger (he also hits himself and bites himself when he is mad) but will bang his head to get out of his room at nap time/bed time. We have been told by both our therapist and our pedi to walk away and he normally stops. The longest we will let him go is 30-40 minutes of crying. 

Well now he his himself so hard that he has broken skin. 

 

I don't know what to do. We need with our Pedi on the 3rd, but we have tried spanking, ignoring, redirecting,  giving him a safe place to bang his head and just about everything else I can think of. 

I know I shouldn't worry about it, but seeing blood everywhere because he is hitting his head not not feeling the pain freaks me the heck out. 

 Anyone have any advice?!

Diabetic, 2IF, PCOS; blessed beyond words to be called "mommy" to Drew (6/30/09) and Alynn (5/16/11).
Parenting author for Women of Worth. Mom Blogger and photographer.

 Andrew David: mixed receptive/expressive language phonological disorder, sensory processing disorder, Disruptive Behavior disorder-nos and insomnia.


Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Re: I need help

  • This definitely IS something valid to worry about. Headbanging can cause serious internal damage, aside from the short-term disruption that its causing your family and, most importantly, your son. 

    Are you seeing a behaviorist to help with these issues? That'd be my first stop. They'll help you establish the reason the behavior is occurring and also develop a plan that everybody in your family/teachers/therapists can follow through on. Its very important to establish the cause/function of the behavior, because it really is different for each child and your reaction should really be based on the function of the behavior. You'll want a board certified behaviorist. (BCBA). You can find one by going to the certifying board's website: bacb.com and putting in your zip. In the meantime, before you meet with them, keep an eye on when its happening. Is it usually at the same time of day? What's happening before it occurs? How does your response change the frequency? You may want to jot down a few thoughts on these things as the behaviorist will likely ask you these questions in addition to doing observation themselves. 

    Aside from that, you may want to get a neuro on board. Depending on the severity of the behaviors, you may need to consider a med. Some people do these long term. Others use them as a buffer to help mellow things out so that the child can respond to behavior management in the best way possible. That'll all depend on your individual situation. You'll want your pediatrician on board with any medication your child is taking, so I'd def. still bring it up with them. (Our ped. manages DDs meds since we can get into them more frequently than our neuro at the drop of a hat if we need to and have them call our neuro for a phone consult). The last thought, would be when you're addressing the cause of the behaviors to rule out that its not something to do with pain. A general assessment by your pediatrician should help with this. Some children will exhibit headbanging behaviors because they have an ear infection, tooth infection, or headache/migraine. Ruling this type of of cause out will be helpful to everyone. 

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    "In a wild sea of eyes I'd see one pair that I recognize and know that I am the luckiest"- Ben Folds
  • image MummyGruetzie:

    This definitely IS something valid to worry about. Headbanging can cause serious internal damage, aside from the short-term disruption that its causing your family and, most importantly, your son. 

    Glad to know I am not crazy being worried about it! 

    Are you seeing a behaviorist to help with these issues? That'd be my first stop. They'll help you establish the reason the behavior is occurring and also develop a plan that everybody in your family/teachers/therapists can follow through on. Its very important to establish the cause/function of the behavior, because it really is different for each child and your reaction should really be based on the function of the behavior. You'll want a board certified behaviorist. (BCBA). You can find one by going to the certifying board's website: bacb.com and putting in your zip. In the meantime, before you meet with them, keep an eye on when its happening. Is it usually at the same time of day? What's happening before it occurs? How does your response change the frequency? You may want to jot down a few thoughts on these things as the behaviorist will likely ask you these questions in addition to doing observation themselves. 

    We have a consult with a neurobehavioral specialist the beginning of September. I am documenting it all to show them. We are talking to them about this, autism, sleep issues and GI issues. 

    Aside from that, you may want to get a neuro on board. Depending on the severity of the behaviors, you may need to consider a med. Some people do these long term. Others use them as a buffer to help mellow things out so that the child can respond to behavior management in the best way possible. That'll all depend on your individual situation. You'll want your pediatrician on board with any medication your child is taking, so I'd def. still bring it up with them. (Our ped. manages DDs meds since we can get into them more frequently than our neuro at the drop of a hat if we need to and have them call our neuro for a phone consult). The last thought, would be when you're addressing the cause of the behaviors to rule out that its not something to do with pain. A general assessment by your pediatrician should help with this. Some children will exhibit headbanging behaviors because they have an ear infection, tooth infection, or headache/migraine. Ruling this type of of cause out will be helpful to everyone. 

    I am pretty sure it isn't pain because this has been going on since he was 15 months old (it was our original reason to bring up development issues). Our pedi said she would really address it at his 3 year appointment, which is on Tuesday. This is the first time he has hit himself so hard he bleeds though.

    It is SO freaky to watch, and it breaks my heart that he is hurting himself like this! 

    Diabetic, 2IF, PCOS; blessed beyond words to be called "mommy" to Drew (6/30/09) and Alynn (5/16/11).
    Parenting author for Women of Worth. Mom Blogger and photographer.

     Andrew David: mixed receptive/expressive language phonological disorder, sensory processing disorder, Disruptive Behavior disorder-nos and insomnia.


    Image and video hosting by TinyPic

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