SLPs may never officially diagnose DS with apraxia — The Bump
Special Needs

SLPs may never officially diagnose DS with apraxia

So DS has been given a "working diagnosis of apraxia" through our private SLP. Inititally they did this to see if our insurance would cover therarpy (it didn't). Anyway, they are still leaning toward this diagnosis and so is our EI therapist. So this morning at our session I asked when they give out the official diagnosis (most things I've read have indicated not before age 3 - just wanted to hear confirmation). Our SLP said probably never... because once a diagnosis is given, it stays with the child forever and could affect future education, jobs, etc. Like if DS wanted to go into the military it might hinder his chances, for example. Anyone heard the same thing?   
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Re: SLPs may never officially diagnose DS with apraxia

  • Whoa whatwhatwhat?  I'm an SLP also and I have never heard of such a thing, especially related to a diagnosis of apraxia.  There is no reason to think that a formal diagnosis of apraxia would necessarily stick with your son forever and affect future jobs, education, etc (beyond services that he may qualify for once he hits school age, such as speech therapy), IMO.
  • yaleyale member

    imageOSULori:
    Whoa whatwhatwhat?  I'm an SLP also and I have never heard of such a thing, especially related to a diagnosis of apraxia.  There is no reason to think that a formal diagnosis of apraxia would necessarily stick with your son forever and affect future jobs, education, etc (beyond services that he may qualify for once he hits school age, such as speech therapy), IMO.

    Seemed weird to me too. She reinforced it with a story about a kid in a similar boat who went to our Children's Hospital (great repuatation) and they wouldn't give a diagnosis either.

    We're switching SLPs soon because she's moving, so I'll be interested to see what happens with our new therapist.

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  • imageyale:

    imageOSULori:
    Whoa whatwhatwhat?  I'm an SLP also and I have never heard of such a thing, especially related to a diagnosis of apraxia.  There is no reason to think that a formal diagnosis of apraxia would necessarily stick with your son forever and affect future jobs, education, etc (beyond services that he may qualify for once he hits school age, such as speech therapy), IMO.

    Seemed weird to me too. She reinforced it with a story about a kid in a similar boat who went to our Children's Hospital (great repuatation) and they wouldn't give a diagnosis either.

    We're switching SLPs soon because she's moving, so I'll be interested to see what happens with our new therapist.

    Interesting.  I honestly have to wonder if there were other reasons the children's hospital wouldn't give a dx besides what she told you, because it just doesn't make sense to me.  Hopefully your new therapist is more willing to make the formal dx if she feels its appropriate!

  • Never heard this either. Our SLP told us they tend not to diagnose before 3 because it's just too tough to tell at that age if it is really apraxia or a delay. I specifically asked about our daughter potentially being "labelled"  as apraxic and the negative repercussions - everyone was in agreement that the "label" would be a positive in terms of services.
  • HTF would anyone know what your kid was diagnosed at age three when they are an adult??

    HTF would anyone get information like that without HIPPA consent from the applicant??

    This.makes.no.damn.sense.

    I guess maybe if it is in their school records? Would it still show up in a high school record somehow? That's some pretty damn good record keeping if you ask me.

    If the military is digging all the way back to your child's kindie records to decide if they are a sound candidate or not for general military service, then we got bigger problems.....Stick out tongue

    WAY 2 Cool 4 School


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  • image-auntie-:

    At this moment in time, something like 70% of all potential recruits don't meet the standards for miliatry service because of drug use (prescription and recreational), health, criminal record or lack of education.


    http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2011/05/13/3-out-of-4-young-people-unfit-to-serve-in-u-s-military/

    Well yeah sure THAT makes sense, but Apraxia? I agree that that chick is wacked.

    WAY 2 Cool 4 School


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  • I was an apraxic child and it did not affect me negatively in any way. You would never know as an adult (or even past 3rd grade) that I ever had a problem.
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  • imageKC_13:
    I was an apraxic child and it did not affect me negatively in any way. You would never know as an adult (or even past 3rd grade) that I ever had a problem.

    This is more what I was getting at. A potential employer using her kindie records as a measuring stick now would be whacked.

    I can now see where Auntie is going with this discussion.....things that make you go "hmmmmm"

    WAY 2 Cool 4 School


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  • image-auntie-:
    imageAssembly_Reqd:

    Well yeah sure THAT makes sense, but Apraxia? I agree that that chick is wacked.

    Well, an apraxic drill sargeant would be the stuff of a sit com. It's funny, everybody gets excited claiming Sheldon on Big Bang Theory has Aspergers, but nobody mentions Kripky who clearly has apraxia.

    We had a scout with apraxia. He was on a hike with a small group when one in their party had a fatal MI. One adult took charge of the younger scouts, another did CPR (for almost 4 hours) and the kid (then 16) dialed 911 on his cell. They were in state park that fell under several jurisdictions and communicating their location was a challenge. For a kid who can't say "R" Harriman Park is a mouthful; for the listener (who probably thought he was being pranked) it was frustrating.

     

    As an SLP I would have to disagree with this comment. Kripke seems to have just a simple speech sound disorder characterised by a lisp and the substitution of 'w' for the 'r' and 'l' sound (known as gliding). His speech does not appear to have apraxic qualities from what I have seen.

    And to the OP - It does not make sense to me either to withhold a formal diagnosis on that basis. Hopefully your new therapist can give you the diagnosis if it is appropriate for you LO. Good luck! 

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