Token (or anyone else) - A meat Q — The Bump
May 2011 Moms

Token (or anyone else) - A meat Q

I remember you posting way back when about starting meats early. My question is how do you plan on serving it? In giant pieces so big that all LO can do is hold it and suck on it, or would you mash any of it up? What about chicken - being all stringy, it makes me nervous. We're going to do BLW if that wasn't obvious. :) Thanks!

Re: Token (or anyone else) - A meat Q

  • I am curious about this as well.
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  • imagemullenem:

    I'm curious about this as well...I would think that you'd do a thin-ish (less than a dime in circumference) piece that's long enough for them to fist and have a bit sticking out that they can gum at. 

    I can't wait to see the look on my family's faces on Thanksgiving when I hand A a chunk of turkey Stick out tongue

    I'm looking forward to Thanksgiving, too! I'm *thankful* that DS will be over 6 months for it. He's so close to sitting up now, too, so I feel like he may be ready by the time it rolls around. 

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  • Have you read the BLW book? It's pretty great. And they actually have a forum, too.

    I'll give him chicken on the bone to gnaw at (just a bit of meat left) - thighs are good for that. Red meat gets sliced across the grain so it's easier to get apart and given in slices big enough  to be held and gnawed at the other end. In the beginning, you want everything to be sort of french fry shaped.

    Boiled egg is another protein source - not sure how little hands can catch it, but I'd probably just cut the egg into some biggish bits. We're not waiting on egg white.

    Plus canned tuna and salmon (no bones). That's bound to be messy, but the salmon especially is really good for them. It has actual omega 3's instead of plant-based supplements that can't be absorbed (which is what most baby products have in them when they have big claims on the label).

    http://www.babyledweaning.com/

  • My copy of the BLW cookbook just came in- it says to offer in large strips or on the bone or patties/burgers after the first couple of weeks.  They also suggest stewing or slow cooking versus grilling so the meat isn't chewy. 

    For chicken they say to tear meat off the breast along the grain so the chicken stays in one piece.  

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  • imagetokenhoser:

    Have you read the BLW book? It's pretty great. And they actually have a forum, too.

    I'll give him chicken on the bone to gnaw at (just a bit of meat left) - thighs are good for that. Red meat gets sliced across the grain so it's easier to get apart and given in slices big enough  to be held and gnawed at the other end. In the beginning, you want everything to be sort of french fry shaped.

    Boiled egg is another protein source - not sure how little hands can catch it, but I'd probably just cut the egg into some biggish bits. We're not waiting on egg white.

    Plus canned tuna and salmon (no bones). That's bound to be messy, but the salmon especially is really good for them. It has actual omega 3's instead of plant-based supplements that can't be absorbed (which is what most baby products have in them when they have big claims on the label).

    http://www.babyledweaning.com/

    Thanks! Yes, I have the BLW book. I read it when pregnant and reviewed it last month. I guess I couldn't remember anything about meats and I was curious to hear what you were planning. :)

  • imagemelpatbat:
    I gave a  turkey leg bone to DS this past weekend for Thanksgiving (we're Canadian).  I took all the meat off it and my family thought I was nuts.  He absolutely loved it.  He just turned 5mo and is showing all the readiness signs but hasn't lost he tongue reflex yet so despite putting food in his mouth when we give it to him he doesn't actually swallow anything yet.

    BLW says that's normal - that self-fed babies will learn to chew and move food around the mouth first, and to swallow it later. Spoon fed babies are the opposite, which can mean they're more prone to gagging and choking because they haven't had the chance to figure out what to do with their tongue to control the food.

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