UO Thursday — The Bump
March 2018 Moms

UO Thursday

Tell us your crappy opinion 
Me:29  DH:33
Married: 3/1/14
TTC #1: 4/16
Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
FET of 1 embryo 7/12
BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



«13

Re: UO Thursday

  • Here's my crappy opinion.  I just got this thing popping up on my screen for the second day in a row while on TB app. Our FB migration cannot come soon enough :/
    ***March '18 October Siggy Challenge: Halloween Costume Fails***

    antotoLaurenAnn0405deleted22152218muggle621
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  • antotoantoto
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    member
    edited October 2017
    Oh also if you homeschool your kids I assume 80% of the time they got a substandard education.  Same for if you sent your kids to Waldorf or similar.  (ETA yes I know some people homeschool their kids and it can be the best thing ever.  But I think they are significantly in the minority)
    Me:29  DH:33
    Married: 3/1/14
    TTC #1: 4/16
    Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
    5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
    Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
    IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
    7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
    FET of 1 embryo 7/12
    BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



  • antoto said:
    Oh also if you homeschool your kids I assume 80% of the time they got a substandard education.  Same for if you sent your kids to Waldorf or similar.  (ETA yes I know some people homeschool their kids and it can be the best thing ever.  But I think they are significantly in the minority)
    I have a very good friend who was homeschooled by her mom, and she and all of her siblings are exceptionally smart and successful as adults.  I have noticed that they are lacking in the pop culture department, which is kinda funny at times, but in the grand scheme of things, that doesn't seem all too important.

    I think I generally agree with you, though.  I think they are probably in the minority and can credit their mother, who just happened to be exactly the type of person who can successfully home school (extremely smart and educated and committed).

    I am curious as to how Waldorf relates to that though?  I don't know anything about that program really but thought it was similar to Montessori.
    ***March '18 October Siggy Challenge: Halloween Costume Fails***

    antoto
  • antoto said:
    Oh also if you homeschool your kids I assume 80% of the time they got a substandard education.  Same for if you sent your kids to Waldorf or similar.  (ETA yes I know some people homeschool their kids and it can be the best thing ever.  But I think they are significantly in the minority)
    I have a very good friend who was homeschooled by her mom, and she and all of her siblings are exceptionally smart and successful as adults.  I have noticed that they are lacking in the pop culture department, which is kinda funny at times, but in the grand scheme of things, that doesn't seem all too important.

    I think I generally agree with you, though.  I think they are probably in the minority and can credit their mother, who just happened to be exactly the type of person who can successfully home school (extremely smart and educated and committed).

    I am curious as to how Waldorf relates to that though?  I don't know anything about that program really but thought it was similar to Montessori.
    Waldorf (and Montessori) can be excellent for pre-K type programs but have extremely unusual practices as kids get further on.  Like not teaching kids to read until 3rd grade.  
    Me:29  DH:33
    Married: 3/1/14
    TTC #1: 4/16
    Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
    5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
    Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
    IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
    7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
    FET of 1 embryo 7/12
    BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



    vflux33
  • When people bash others over Facebook statuses - or the like- that realllllly don’t affect them (ie not political or asking for opinions) I assume they have boring lives.  
    vflux33deleted22152218barrelocarolcalecorvus
  • antoto said:
    antoto said:
    Oh also if you homeschool your kids I assume 80% of the time they got a substandard education.  Same for if you sent your kids to Waldorf or similar.  (ETA yes I know some people homeschool their kids and it can be the best thing ever.  But I think they are significantly in the minority)
    I have a very good friend who was homeschooled by her mom, and she and all of her siblings are exceptionally smart and successful as adults.  I have noticed that they are lacking in the pop culture department, which is kinda funny at times, but in the grand scheme of things, that doesn't seem all too important.

    I think I generally agree with you, though.  I think they are probably in the minority and can credit their mother, who just happened to be exactly the type of person who can successfully home school (extremely smart and educated and committed).

    I am curious as to how Waldorf relates to that though?  I don't know anything about that program really but thought it was similar to Montessori.
    Waldorf (and Montessori) can be excellent for pre-K type programs but have extremely unusual practices as kids get further on.  Like not teaching kids to read until 3rd grade.  
    Oh, sheeeeesh, @antoto.  Now I'm going to have to go down the rabbit hole of finding out *why* that is.  That hardly seems like a good idea!
    ***March '18 October Siggy Challenge: Halloween Costume Fails***

    antotomuggle621
  • I don't like when unmedicated and low intervention births are called "natural" births. 
    Ok so I need clarification on this apparently because I've seen like 17 different definitions. What exactly is a natural birth then? I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm just ignorant.
  • Totally agree on it not being a good idea to teach reading until 3rd grade. Why?
  • edited October 2017
    @Gingermom15, I apologize.  How you describe your family is similar to how I described my homeschool friend's family, but I also added the commentary saying I think they are in the minority.  I don't know why I have the perception to the contrary, honestly, because I don't know anyone else that's has been homeschooled.  I should probably check those kinds of thoughts, so thanks for speaking out.

    FWIW, I don't think my friend is socially awkward.  She and her siblings lack awareness of pop culture from our school-age years (little to no knowledge of movies and music and TV shows), but again, as I said, who cares, really, in the grand scheme of things.
    ***March '18 October Siggy Challenge: Halloween Costume Fails***

    vflux33mdfarmchick
  • antoto said:
    My parents homeschooled myself and four of my siblings. Our education and preparation for life was anything but substandard, we integrated better into adulthood than the vast majority of our friends and public schooled cousins of the same age. We are more successful adults than they are, as well. I really don’t mean that as a brag, but most of them are working making barely above minimum wage, living at home and no desire to achieve better, while my siblings and I have homes, families and nest egg security. At the same age. 
    Possibly UO, but I hate when people assume we were lacking, had substandard education or expect us to be socially odd because we were homeschooled. Quite honestly, it is offensive to myself and my family. 
    Reminder that I said I'm aware that some who were homeschooled were extremely successful in doing so.  The youngest professor at MIT was homeschooled.  I'm aware of this.
    How many homeschooled families have you observed to make this assumption? That only “some” are successful. Within our homeschool network, quite large during my childhood, the majority of children went on to receive college degrees and well-paying jobs. 
    Certainly, being homeschooled is not right for every child and family, but doing so unsuccessfully has been quite minor from all the years I have witnessed 
    HappyMonkey817barrelocarol
  • antotoantoto
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    member
    edited October 2017
    antoto said:
    My parents homeschooled myself and four of my siblings. Our education and preparation for life was anything but substandard, we integrated better into adulthood than the vast majority of our friends and public schooled cousins of the same age. We are more successful adults than they are, as well. I really don’t mean that as a brag, but most of them are working making barely above minimum wage, living at home and no desire to achieve better, while my siblings and I have homes, families and nest egg security. At the same age. 
    Possibly UO, but I hate when people assume we were lacking, had substandard education or expect us to be socially odd because we were homeschooled. Quite honestly, it is offensive to myself and my family. 
    Reminder that I said I'm aware that some who were homeschooled were extremely successful in doing so.  The youngest professor at MIT was homeschooled.  I'm aware of this.
    How many homeschooled families have you observed to make this assumption? That only “some” are successful. Within our homeschool network, quite large during my childhood, the majority of children went on to receive college degrees and well-paying jobs. 
    Certainly, being homeschooled is not right for every child and family, but doing so unsuccessfully has been quite minor from all the years I have witnessed 
    I've witnessed it when the kids come back into public high school and are unable to catch up.

    If you have a science curriculum that is based from a creationist perspective you are going to have a substandard education.

    ETA - all of this is not to suggest I think public education everywhere is amazing.  I can totally understand why someone may want to homeschool if the public school in their area is dangerous or horribly underfunded.
    Me:29  DH:33
    Married: 3/1/14
    TTC #1: 4/16
    Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
    5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
    Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
    IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
    7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
    FET of 1 embryo 7/12
    BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



  • antoto said:
    antoto said:
    My parents homeschooled myself and four of my siblings. Our education and preparation for life was anything but substandard, we integrated better into adulthood than the vast majority of our friends and public schooled cousins of the same age. We are more successful adults than they are, as well. I really don’t mean that as a brag, but most of them are working making barely above minimum wage, living at home and no desire to achieve better, while my siblings and I have homes, families and nest egg security. At the same age. 
    Possibly UO, but I hate when people assume we were lacking, had substandard education or expect us to be socially odd because we were homeschooled. Quite honestly, it is offensive to myself and my family. 
    Reminder that I said I'm aware that some who were homeschooled were extremely successful in doing so.  The youngest professor at MIT was homeschooled.  I'm aware of this.
    How many homeschooled families have you observed to make this assumption? That only “some” are successful. Within our homeschool network, quite large during my childhood, the majority of children went on to receive college degrees and well-paying jobs. 
    Certainly, being homeschooled is not right for every child and family, but doing so unsuccessfully has been quite minor from all the years I have witnessed 
    I've witnessed it when the kids come back into public high school and are unable to catch up.

    If you have a science curriculum that is based from a creationist perspective you are going to have a substandard education.
    That doesn’t mean this is the norm for homeschooled kids, though. It is pretty unfair to assume that 80% of the time they are going to be lacking, especially if you hear someone is homeschooled and do not know the circumstances. It is an ignorant generalization that I have spent my life hearing about. If I choose to homeschool my children, it is sad that they would have to deal with the same assumptions in our day and age when generalizing a population is considered rude. 
    HappyMonkey817barrelocarol
  • snip
    That doesn’t mean this is the norm for homeschooled kids, though. It is pretty unfair to assume that 80% of the time they are going to be lacking, especially if you hear someone is homeschooled and do not know the circumstances. It is an ignorant generalization that I have spent my life hearing about. If I choose to homeschool my children, it is sad that they would have to deal with the same assumptions in our day and age when generalizing a population is considered rude. 
    I just looked it up at 64-77% of the US homeschooled population is doing it for religious reasons.  So I guess 80% was high.  I'll adjust it to this.  

    To expand on my thoughts here - I don't assume homeschooled people are unintelligent or unable to hold jobs or graduate from college.  That's nonsense and I have not said that here.  I believe that the majority of them received what I personally believe to be an incomplete education.
    Me:29  DH:33
    Married: 3/1/14
    TTC #1: 4/16
    Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
    5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
    Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
    IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
    7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
    FET of 1 embryo 7/12
    BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



    ShawnnaOkiki75ksmwaltersmuggle621
  • This is not directed at anyone here because I see it everywhere, all the time and it all runs together. I really hate the "I'm team (XYZ)!" trend. I wish it would stop.

    Stuck in quote...
    The only one I think is remotely acceptable is saying you are Team Green.  This is just for the brief few months before birth.  After that, team "anything" needs to go.
    notthefathercford08muggle621
  • I'm curious, @Gingermom15, if your knowledge and experience is as @antoto is describing with regard to how science was taught to you and to others you know.  I'm purely curious at this point, so if that feels like I'm being confrontational, I understand if you don't want to answer.

    I was also also wondering if it is fair to assume that the children who are being *successfully* homeschooled aren't generally the ones entering public school at a late age and may be the reason for these perceptions from an educator's perspective.  Like I said, I'm not sure where my own perceptions stem from, but my mom was a career educator, so maybe it came from her having had similar experiences to @Antoto with kids entering the school system after having been home schooled.









    ***March '18 October Siggy Challenge: Halloween Costume Fails***

    kiki75DDRRT1982vflux33ksmwalters
  • I'm curious, @Gingermom15, if your knowledge and experience is as @antoto is describing with regard to how science was taught to you and to others you know.  I'm purely curious at this point, so if that feels like I'm being confrontational, I understand if you don't want to answer.

    I was also also wondering if it is fair to assume that the children who are being *successfully* homeschooled aren't generally the ones entering public school at a late age and may be the reason for these perceptions from an educator's perspective.  Like I said, I'm not sure where my own perceptions stem from, but my mom was a career educator, so maybe it came from her having had similar experiences to @Antoto with kids entering the school system after having been home schooled.









    Additionally though my UO was specifically only about religious curriculum (which I now realized I should have specified) and I don't know if Gingermom had that.  20-30% of homeschool families are not doing it for religious reasons.  

    I definitely think my view from a public school has impacted my perception of homeschooling.

    But also regardless of that I think any curriculum where you don't learn about the truth of scientific theories and historical documents is incomplete.  I have never suggested here that these kids couldn't find a job or graduate college and I don't love that this is being put in my mouth, tbh.
    Me:29  DH:33
    Married: 3/1/14
    TTC #1: 4/16
    Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
    5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
    Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
    IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
    7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
    FET of 1 embryo 7/12
    BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



    ShawnnaOksmwaltersmuggle621
  • antoto said:
    snip
    That doesn’t mean this is the norm for homeschooled kids, though. It is pretty unfair to assume that 80% of the time they are going to be lacking, especially if you hear someone is homeschooled and do not know the circumstances. It is an ignorant generalization that I have spent my life hearing about. If I choose to homeschool my children, it is sad that they would have to deal with the same assumptions in our day and age when generalizing a population is considered rude. 
    I just looked it up at 64-77% of the US homeschooled population is doing it for religious reasons.  So I guess 80% was high.  I'll adjust it to this.  

    To expand on my thoughts here - I don't assume homeschooled people are unintelligent or unable to hold jobs or graduate from college.  That's nonsense and I have not said that here.  I believe that the majority of them received what I personally believe to be an incomplete education.
    My parents homeschooled for religious reasons, they technically tell people, our education curriculum was never religion based. My mom built her own curriculum because it was impossible to find a solid curriculum (20+ years ago), but we never learned creationism and religion alongside our education. It was taught to us separately if we chose to do so. 
    After years of hearing ill comments about being homeschooled, the judgement tends to get old. Especially grouping all homeschoolers into the same category. 
    cford08Cowboycorgibarrelocarol
  • antoto said:
    snip
    I just looked it up at 64-77% of the US homeschooled population is doing it for religious reasons.  So I guess 80% was high.  I'll adjust it to this.  

    To expand on my thoughts here - I don't assume homeschooled people are unintelligent or unable to hold jobs or graduate from college.  That's nonsense and I have not said that here.  I believe that the majority of them received what I personally believe to be an incomplete education.
    My parents homeschooled for religious reasons, they technically tell people, our education curriculum was never religion based. My mom built her own curriculum because it was impossible to find a solid curriculum (20+ years ago), but we never learned creationism and religion alongside our education. It was taught to us separately if we chose to do so. 
    After years of hearing ill comments about being homeschooled, the judgement tends to get old. Especially grouping all homeschoolers into the same category. 
    Okay but it's not an unfair assumption that people who homeschool for religious purposes most likely use religiously based curriculum, and that even if they don't they probably don't teach about evolution and separation of church and state in the same way that would be taught in a public school.  

    Me:29  DH:33
    Married: 3/1/14
    TTC #1: 4/16
    Dx PCOS (Non IR) 10/16
    5mg Femara + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 11/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 75 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel + IUI + Progesterone: 12/16 = BFN
    5mg Femara + 150 IU Gonal-F + Ovidrel +IUI +Progesterone: 1/17 = BFN
    Preparing for IVF - Birth Control: 4/17 Stims: 5/17 
    IVF retrieval 6/17: 21 eggs retrieved, 20 mature.  17 fertilized with ICSI.
    7 blasts biopsied for PGS.  6 Healthy Embryos frozen for FET.
    FET of 1 embryo 7/12
    BFP on 7/17/17 Beta #1 10dpt = 524 Beta #2 12dpt = 1432 US at 5+5 shows healthy baby with heartbeat. Baby girl due 3/30/18 



  • @kiki75 You always word things so amazingly!  <3
    Me: 30 H: 30
    Dx: PCOS
    Married: June 2013
    TTC#1: January 2015
    BFP #1 8/24/15 | MC 9/3/15 at 6w2d
    BFP #2: 12/12/15 | DD born 8/29/16
    TTC#2: June 2017
    BFP #3: 7/15/17 | DS born 3/20/18
    DDRRT1982barrelocarol
  • TB is being dumb. It won’t let me tag/quote/love it’s and is keeps crashing. Hopefully this one posts, I’m not ditching the convo if I disappear! Also not sure if it’s loading all the comments. 

    FWIW I did not intend to put words in your mouth in terms of what is defined as successful, I realize that what constitutes success may vary from person to person. For me (in terms of homeschooling), it is becoming an adult able to integrate and prove themselves useful to society, being able to support yourself and securing a future. It would make sense @antoto that your definition, as an educator, that successful homeschooled child is to be taught a completed curriculum. Honestly, my mind never went to being religious based because we were taught the same as our public schooled friends and family, as many in our homeschool groups were. 
    We most definitely agree upon religious based curriculum being incomplete, but just because someone homeschooled for religious reasons (as my parents did), doesn’t necessarily mean they are being taught a religious based curriculum (as we were not). 
    I keep in contact with quite a few homeschool cohorts, and many are teaching their own children using scientifically based curriculum. It may give you some hope that the homeschool due to religion may begin to even with other reasons. 
    DDRRT1982antotovflux33barrelocarol
  • Also, disregard typos. Can’t edit either (eff you TB)
  • @Antoto Also, to clarify, I did have a creationist based curriculum with religious courses and all the rest, and I never had an issue with it in any college classes. It never had any bearing on my career, or any problem that lead to me not being able to get a job.
    And I don't have any problem with people learning about evolution. :)  
    barrelocarol
  • @pregobeth girl, I had outside math tutors almost daily from age 6-7 until I graduated. I still had to take remedial math when I entered college lol. It’s no ones fault, really. I despised math and everything about it until I started working on mathematics in nursing school. I would have never believed I could convert and calculate the hinge I can now, I can do it because it interests me and patient care is what I love. Working on numbers just to solve the equation was useless, silly and uninteresting to me until it had a purpose. 
  • @Gingermom15 I hated math so much too! It wasn't until I had really great teachers at my 2 year college that made me interested in math for scientists. Once I got to the four year college though, my Math teachers were terrible, and I switched to business statistics because I really enjoyed the first stats class I took. I enjoyed stats all the way through, but I have never used it since college  :D   
    barrelocarol
  • Gingermom15Gingermom15
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
    member
    edited October 2017
    I was taught that a natural birth was vaginal and a surgical Birth was a cesarean. In medical terms, a natural birth isn’t defined as to whether or not you had an epidural or pain medications, it is defined as the baby exiting your vagina. A CS is a surgical birth, and surgery is an unnatural opening into the body. 
    Birth is defined as the neonate being physically separated from the mother. Therefore, it is impossible for birth to be unnatural as it always occurs via baby exiting from somewhere. Whether or not it is vaginal or surgical I think is where the confusion often lies. 

     Edited to clarify that I was taught in nursing school that, in layman’s terms, a “natural” birth often means vaginal to most people. 
    mdfarmchickbarrelocarol
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