Parenting

School options, all-girls or neighborhood?

My daughter will be starting Kindergarten this fall. We have narrowed our choices to two options. I outlined my issues below and I would love some feedback:

Deciding between:
#1 An all-girls private school (non-denominational & cost is not an issue thanks to financial aid)
#2 A very good public neighborhood school.

-Both schools are very innovative and progressive. I think my daughter would do wonderful in both. 

Issues: 
-The girls school would be ideal, except:

-If we send her there we are breaking somewhat with our very close and wonderful local community. We are close with the families in our neighborhood and spend lots of time together. We can even walk to eachothers houses. This has been amazing for us and the kids. I would hate to mess with this dynamic.  

-Our community is ethnically and economically diverse. The girls' school is much less so. That is also a major drawback. 

-The girls' school is also a longer commute. 

-However, I believe the all-female environment will be especially beneficial to our daughter. She's very interested in science. We have heard from other families that this school is especially good for girls who are interested in science since they do not have to compete with boys. 




Re: School options, all-girls or neighborhood?

  • It's kindergarten. She's going to be "competing" with boys her whole life so I'm really not sure what benefit she'll derive from being sheltered from that reality as a 5 year old. I think the benefits of being in a diverse classroom where she learns to excel and interact with children from all different walks of life is the best way to prepare her to a be a mature and well-rounded young woman. Creating an artificial petri dish of a schooling experience so that she can be good at something is silly. How will you know what she excels at if she isn't up against the "best"? Being a girl shouldn't make her any less successful at science if that's what she loves.

    Just my 0.02.
    Feb '16 October Siggy Challenge: Favorite Candy


    Synnovusvibarra27SmrBrd2012theredofhead
  • It's kindergarten. She's going to be "competing" with boys her whole life so I'm really not sure what benefit she'll derive from being sheltered from that reality as a 5 year old. I think the benefits of being in a diverse classroom where she learns to excel and interact with children from all different walks of life is the best way to prepare her to a be a mature and well-rounded young woman. Creating an artificial petri dish of a schooling experience so that she can be good at something is silly. How will you know what she excels at if she isn't up against the "best"? Being a girl shouldn't make her any less successful at science if that's what she loves.

    Just my 0.02.
    This! 
  • I agree with these ladies! 
  • MrsFL2015MrsFL2015 member
    500 Love Its 100 Comments Second Anniversary First Answer
    edited March 2016
    There are a few questions:  What about class sizes?  Potential academic and social opportunities (clubs/sports) in the future?   Do you feel the science program at the private school is better than the one offered at the public school?  I'm a teacher and I believe in the public education system; however,  I also believe that education isn't one size fits all.  Some kids do better in small classes, with children of the same gender, or with programs/curriculum that interest them.  What do you truly believe will benefit your child's personality and interests in the long run?   Has your daughter visited both schools?   Why not take her to both schools and see which one she reacts to more positively?  You want her to feel comfortable and secure while at school.  If one environment is truly more comfortable for her, then it's the better fit. 

    Also, you can always try the private school for a year.  If it's not a good fit, then enroll her in the public school for 1st grade.   Good luck!

  • Of course, it is better to send her to the neighborhood school. What is the point of protecting her from the reality? She is talented enough to face challenges and be able to overcome them.

    vibarra27
  • Also, if she's interested in a male dominated field like science, wouldn't it be better for her to learn how to compete (or at least be comfortable in her own knowledge and skills) with boys present? I can't imagine having gone to school my whole life (as an engineer) having been separated from boys/men and then being expected to work side by side and in most cases compete with them for jobs. I would think that would be a hindrance more than an advantage.
    Meg
    ME: 30  DH: 30 DD: Born June '16 :::: Married since 2011 :::: USN Wife

    vibarra27
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