Home Birth Check In? — The Bump
January 2016 Moms

Home Birth Check In?

I've seen a few mentions recently about people planning home births, and I was hoping we could have a check in to see how we're all feeling.  I know we have a few things that will be different than for the majority of the women on the board planning a hospital birth. 


1.  Will this be your first baby or your first at home?  First baby for me!

2. Do you have any specifically homebirth anxieties?  I've developed a bit of a complex about going 'late' and not being able to stay with my midwife, who I love, past 42 weeks

3. What is in your 'birth kit', or the equivalent of the hospital bag to pack?  Selfish question because I don't have a clue.  Obviously I'll have all my clothes, toiletries and the babies things at the house already, and I know the midwife has a more 'medical' list (pads, etc) to get, but I feel like I should be packing something else and I just don't know what it is :)


Re: Home Birth Check In?


  • I'm still not 100% sure whether or not I'll deliver at home or in hospital. My midwife is happy to go either way and will deliver for my in hospital if I chose that route. I'm going to be prepared for both and probably decide when the time comes!

    1.  Will this be your first baby or your first at home?  First baby for me too!

    2. Do you have any specifically homebirth anxieties?  I'm paranoid about something going wrong, like shoulder dystocia or baby coming out flat/grey. I know these things can happen in hospital too but it still worries me! I live within 10 minutes of a hospital and a block away from a paramedic station which is the only reason I am even CONSIDERING home birth. 

    3. What is in your 'birth kit', or the equivalent of the hospital bag to pack?  I haven't started preparing any of this! My midwife is going to send me a list of things to prepare and I'll probably start getting things together after that. However, if I do deliver at home I will definitely be doing a waterbirth in a birth pool provided by my midwife. 

    I want to ADD a question!

    4. How do you deal with people's criticism of homebirth or telling you horror stories about homebirth's they've heard?

    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
    Lilypie Second Birthday tickers
    enkb
  • I'm SO excited about my homebirth. I was actually born at home and so was my sister!

    1.  Will this be your first baby or your first at home?  First baby for me!

    2. Do you have any specifically homebirth anxieties?  My biggest fear is something that requires that I transfer to a hospital before my due date. The first hurdle was not having GD. I'm also anemic so I'm currently on a blood building regimen to bring my red blood cells up. It's a lot of supplements since I really can't eat meat these days. I also need to make sure my blood pressure stays down, which hasn't been an issue. 

    3. What is in your 'birth kit', or the equivalent of the hospital bag to pack?  I haven't started preparing at all. My midwife will bring the birth pool to my 36 week home visit. I need to order the birth kit soon. I just feel like doing it to early will jinx things. Other stuff that I'll have are string lights, a comfy robe to wear when I get out of the tub, and something comfortable to wear when I allow my dad to come meet the baby (he and my mom live next door). 

    4. How do you deal with people's criticism of homebirth or telling you horror stories about homebirth's they've heard? I've only dealt with it once, on facebook and I told the woman that she was absolutely not allowed to fear monger on my facebook page. If she wanted to have a rational discussion, that was fine. She never replied. Other than that, I think people know better than to give me crap about something like this. It wouldn't end well for them. My family, however, is completely supportive. 


    enkb
  • Loading the player...
  • 4. I have only been discussing my plans with people who are generally supportive of me, and willing to listen to what I tell them about why I have made this choice. I actually have a folder of scientific papers about the safety of home birth and it helps that my and my husbands parents are very much on board. The negative cmments I have gotten I just try to ignore if the person is not interested in hearing what I have to say, and although it is painful to think about, I always am aware that bad things can happen to babies in hospitals too. I try to remind myself that anecdotal stories from people don't overturn the scientific findings that I am maing a safe decision, and that women birthing in hospitals get told horror stories about hospital borths too. How are you coping with these sorts of things?
  • 1. Second baby first home birth
    2. Baby being too big and going past 42 weeks as well
    3. I didn't realize we needed more than a pool since we'll be at home where everything else is at... Oh and some painters plastic so things don't get all messy
    4. I've had one bad story but other than that everyone is excited and happy for me. A lot have told me they were jealous :)
    enkb
  • 1. First baby
    2. That the pain will be too much and I'll request a transfer
    3. We still have to buy the birth pool liner, and all the items on the list my midwife gave me. We also have to pack a "just in case" bag in case we transfer to the hospital.
    4. Most people don't have much to say. They just say I'm brave. My mom goes "so you still planning on doing it at home?" With doubt in her voice :/
    enkb
  • edited October 2015
    kvacmak said:





    I want to ADD a question!

    4. How do you deal with people's criticism of homebirth or telling you horror stories about homebirth's they've heard?



    Tell them to F off.

    No but seriously tell them, "I did my research." Then laugh it off and change the subject. Changing their mind is too much work, and you know what choice is right for you and your family.
    catgrazenkb
  • 1. Second baby, second homebirth
    2. Going past the due date and having to get induced (DD arrived 3 weeks in advance so it's not likely to happen)
    3. Got a list from my midwife: painters plastic, 2/3 older bedsheets, pads, pants for single use and other little hygiene products like that. She also said that it would be nice to have two RED towels to wrap baby in because red is the one color babies are familiar with so they like it! ;-)
    4. I've learned to say that it's the best option for me but that I fully understand that it's not for everybody. I also add that we live 5 minutes away from the hospital and that our midwife is a neighboor and a friend. But I don't try to justify my decision anymore. The second time around, it's easier not to listen to every comment... ;-)
    enkb
  • Love the red towels tip, I've never heard that before, thanks for sharing @catgraz!
    catgraz
  • 1.  Will this be your first baby or your first at home? Third baby and third homebirth. 

    2. Do you have any specifically homebirth anxieties? Not really. I think the fact that I've done it twice helps me feel more calm and at ease going into it. Birth is fairly normalized for me. My siblings and I were born at home, and as the daughter of a Midwife and Doctor, I've been sort of immersed in it my whole life. The only thing that has really been on my mind is if I deliver before my midwives are able to arrive. (I have a history of quick labours.) I also delivered my last at 37 weeks. Any earlier this time, and I won't be delivering at home. (That's ok with me though, as I'd like to have a pre term baby in a hospital vs home anyways.)  

    3. What is in your 'birth kit', or the equivalent of the hospital bag to pack? I am gathering a small basket based on a list my Midwife gave me. I can post it below, 

    Homebirth supplies: 
    olive oil
    bowl/pan for placenta
    plastic sheet for bed
    extra wash cloths and a bowl for hot water compresses
    garbage bags (for the chux pads and pool lining - easy clean up) 
    hand mirror
    good nights bed pad
    bendy straws
    ice chips 

    Waterbirth supplies:
    extra towels
    drop cloth to spread under pool
    hose 
    small sieve (you guessed it...) 
    pool/adaptor and pliers/inflator 
    drain pump & hose
    flannel sheet or blanket to wrap baby in

    postpartum supplies:
    depends pads or underwear
    comfortable clothing for mother
    thermometer to monitor mother first 24 hours
    nursing pads
    cloth pads
    peri bottle
    hydrogen peroxide (in case of any blood stains) 
    acetaminophen or homeopathic pain relief
    breast cream

  • enkb said:
    4. I have only been discussing my plans with people who are generally supportive of me, and willing to listen to what I tell them about why I have made this choice. I actually have a folder of scientific papers about the safety of home birth and it helps that my and my husbands parents are very much on board. The negative cmments I have gotten I just try to ignore if the person is not interested in hearing what I have to say, and although it is painful to think about, I always am aware that bad things can happen to babies in hospitals too. I try to remind myself that anecdotal stories from people don't overturn the scientific findings that I am maing a safe decision, and that women birthing in hospitals get told horror stories about hospital borths too. How are you coping with these sorts of things?
    I work in healthcare so a lot of people who do criticize or tell horror stories do so with the intention of 'warning' or 'educating' me. I work with lots of paramedics and they always say "Oh... I've been to calls like that... they are terrifying" or something along those lines. But the thing is being in emergency we see the worst of the worst. we never see the hundreds (thousands?) of healthy, happy, perfect home births. I try to remind myself of that, but we are trained to prepare for the worst so it's hard to convince anyone who works emergency services otherwise. 

    On another note, is it worth taking acetaminophen during labor? Does it help, even marginally?
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
    Lilypie Second Birthday tickers
  • @kvacmak, I know what you mean, my mom was a nurse for 35 years and so many of her work friends say similar sorts of things. The thing I always either bring up or think to myself, is how often do you see these things in hospital born babies? Studies show that there are really similar rates of complications for either type of birth. I also get frustrated because if it happens in a hospital, people don't blame the birth place as the reason for the problem, they are just grateful that it was able to be dealt with. The same exact thing is true for home birth, if (God forbid) something were to happen needing medical attention with my baby, it will not take us longer to get to a hospital than it would take someone in the hospital already to get seen (by the time the docs are called in, prepped, etc). All the emergency care stuff can be done by the midwife on the way, and the hospital can be notified to be prepping as we drive.
    samara267
  • What do you guys do about the vitamin K injection if you have home births? Does your midwife bring it? You can make the argument that the erythromycin isn't needed if you're monogamous but I've treated neurologically devastated kids from IVH that the vit K would be a must for me; I was just curious how it was administered at a home birth.

    Also, do your midwives carry the meds to treat postpartum hemorrhage? (pitocin IM, etc). Do you guys know what they normally bring with them (med wise) to a birth?

    Just curious, not doing a home birth because I'd be too scared with what I've seen in the past and I know my anxieties would make it an unpleasant experience but I am fascinated by it and the reasons some mothers-to-be decide to go that route. 

    Me: 35, Hubbie: 33
    Married DH: 2013
    DD: Dec 2015
    BFP 8/14/17 --> Due 4/27/2018

    Babysizer Geeky Pregnancy Tracker

  • @MammaDoc, I believe all registered midwives are required to bring (and mine certainly does bring) vitamin K, erythromycin, the hepatitis vaccine, oxygen, and Pitocin to every birth she attends.  She can also administer antibiotics for Group B strep and blood testing kits to test for Rh factor of newborns and will administer Rhogam if needed.  They also have certifications in newborn resuscitation that require yearly classes to maintain, and carry newborn intubation kits.  I am sure there are differences between midwives and in different states and countries, but these are pretty standard as far as I know. 


    I completely understand that home birth is not something everyone wants and totally respect anyone's decision to birth wherever they feel most comfortable and safe.  I am just so glad that this option exists for me as it is what is most comfortable and safe for me and my family.

    samara267usernametaken1
  • @enkb Awesome. Thanks for the info. Good to know they are so prepared for any eventuality! 

    Me: 35, Hubbie: 33
    Married DH: 2013
    DD: Dec 2015
    BFP 8/14/17 --> Due 4/27/2018

    Babysizer Geeky Pregnancy Tracker

    enkbusernametaken1
  • enkb said:

    @MammaDoc, I believe all registered midwives are required to bring (and mine certainly does bring) vitamin K, erythromycin, the hepatitis vaccine, oxygen, and Pitocin to every birth she attends.  She can also administer antibiotics for Group B strep and blood testing kits to test for Rh factor of newborns and will administer Rhogam if needed.  They also have certifications in newborn resuscitation that require yearly classes to maintain, and carry newborn intubation kits.  I am sure there are differences between midwives and in different states and countries, but these are pretty standard as far as I know. 


    I completely understand that home birth is not something everyone wants and totally respect anyone's decision to birth wherever they feel most comfortable and safe.  I am just so glad that this option exists for me as it is what is most comfortable and safe for me and my family.

    From what my midwife has explained to me, they can basically perform a full neonate resus in the home. They have all the supplies to initiate IVs and bring epinephrine and have the capabilities to perform complete NRP protocol in your home. Also, my midwife has explained to me that if there is even a remote question that there will be complications, they will call the paramedics and just have them on stand by just in case. 
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
    Lilypie Second Birthday tickers
    usernametaken1
  • @kvacmak - the acetaminophen on my list is for after labour. To help ease after pains and vaginal swelling/discomfort.
  • The responses for #3 are also, I've read, supplies you might need in case of an unplanned home birth.

    It's hilarious. And I'm not teasing anyone because these are in fact the things you would need!

    It sounds like stuff "Dexter" would carry in his trunk.

    I'm going to go order plastic drop cloths, blood stain remover, giant trash bags, rubber gloves, and disposable clothing on Amazon and wonder if I'll get flagged by the fbi.

    I'll post a screen shot when it says, "People who bought these items also bought...duct tape, a bone saw..."
    mg137fishsticks-n-custardcatgraz
  • I'm not having a home birth but I just wanted to say I think it's awesome to see all these moms who are. Best of luck to all of you. And don't let the criticism get to you. You're making the best decision for you and your family. I believe most of the criticism comes from a lack of knowledge.
    catgrazsamara267
Sign In or Register to comment.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards