Pressure from OB — The Bump
January 2016 Moms

Pressure from OB

My previous OB retired right after dd was born. Before seeing my new doctor for the first time I read reviews online. They all said he was so great and blah, blah. Some of them did say that, although they loved him, he spent the last few minutes of every appointment talking about/selling you these supplements. It's called Nanopak... I'd never heard of them but I guess Dr. Oz is big on them. It'd be $60 a month and insurance doesn't cover supplements. So I've had 3 appointments with him now, and at the end we sit in his office and I ask him my questions. His answer to pretty much every question goes back to these damn supplements and how they have this and that in them that can help with whatever I asked about. I just sit and listen. Last time I told him I'd talk to my husband about it. I'm not good at just flat out saying I DONT' WANT THAT SHIT. I took One a Day prenatals (and taking them again this time) with dd and she turned out fine. Now I'm stuck with what to say at my next appointment to stop the sales pitch for good. I don't want to come off as a bitch but I want to be firm. Any advice?

Re: Pressure from OB

  • I always go for team bitch.

    But you could always tell him thank you for trying to help, but I'm really not interested.
    And if he tries it again be firm, he really shouldn't be trying to sell you anything ESPECIALLY after you tell him you aren't interested.
    TinyDancer51510Beverly0628mvhydeandreachristine81
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  • nackienackie member
    Honestly, how much do you like this OB? i don't know anything about that particular brand, but most of those supplements are super sketchy and I'd be very suspicious of any doctor that tried to sell them to them to me
    claireloSCBeverly0628
  • Probably I'd say something like "I talked to DH and we've decided that, thanks, but we're happy with my current prenatal. And it's also covered by my insurance, which these supplements wouldn't be, so we're going to stick with what we've got." Short, sweet, honest, and to-the-point. That should be enough to get him to shut up. It's probably in your file that you haven't given an answer one way or another, so he's going to keep bringing it up until he gets a yes or no. But once you've said no he'll probably stop talking about it. If not, because I hate confrontation, too, at my next appointment I'd talk to the nurse in the beginning and say hey I really don't want to switch vitamins. Could you put it in my file that doc doesn't need to bring them up with me anymore? It keeps getting harder to find nice ways of saying no thanks.
    ChrissyD1203TinyDancer51510
  • Leah6120Leah6120 member
    edited July 2015
    Dr Oz stopped being a legit dr years ago. He peddles non fda tested crock with no idea of the long term consequences. Never trust when a dr pushing one single brand of a supplement repeatedly. It usually means a deal of some kind has been made. Put your foot down, tell him you don't want it and that's it.
    ChipMonster
  • My grandma watches Dr. Oz and mentioned to me a couple weeks ago that he had a disclaimer on his show that announced that he doesn't endorse anything regarding weight loss or anything that's supposed to be a quick fix or get around, he promotes healthy diet and excercise... So I'd be skeptical. It is obvious that your doc is getting a huge kick back, $$$, from whatever he's trying to sell - or else he wouldn't waste his time.
    TinyDancer51510
  • Saying no isn't bitchy. It's assertive. Don't be afraid to say "no" to your doc, ever. He has a fancy, expensive degree, but he is working for you. When you get your hair done and the stylist asks at every appointment if you want to by her $80 shampoo, do you have a problem telling her "no"?
    TinyDancer51510andreachristine81
  • There is a website where you can see how much money doctors take in from pharma companies each year
    andreachristine81
  • While I understand your guys concerns, just because Dr Oz supports something or the FDA doesn't approve something doesn't mean it's a crock. The FDA monitors and controls a VERY SMALL amount of substances, and has no say in how things are marketed if they're considered "homeopathic" or "natural" remedies. For instance, I know many women on this site use essential oils which are supported by nearly every "quack" TV doc and are not FDA regulated or approved. Does that mean they are dangerous/don't work? It's not my place to say, as I don't use them. The doctor may be getting kick-backs, but I assure you no doctor would agree to market something that they hadn't personally tried or seen evidence of results from. I don't think you need to rush to see a new OB. This one is probably fine, and just found a new supplement that he's excited about and wants to share with patients. Just let him know your opinion and if he doesn't respect your boundaries, THEN think about changing. But only if you don't like him on a professional or personal level. A doctor is supposed to push treatments. That's what they're there for, to help you feel your best.
    ChrissyD1203
  • It's NOT okay for your OB to push something on you you don't want. You have a vitamin that works and isn't so expensive. He needs to drop it. You are going to have to stop being nice and tell him flat out. If that doesn't do it find a new doctor.
    I think nano pak is one of those multi level marketing things
    ChipMonsterandreachristine81
  • Ew.

    He's getting paid to endorse those for the pharmaceutical company. I'd tell him no thanks, and honestly, probably find a new doctor if he kept it up. That's just slimy:
  • sck601sck601 member
    Just say "no thank you" and every time he asks after that, just say "no thank you." That's what I would do.

    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker

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    ChrissyD1203
  • I LOVE this thread, I thought I was the only logical human that thinks Dr. Oz is a waste of oxygen. I'm on my 3rd OB... My first was super judgy (I have my whole life ahead of me, why do I want children at 26 when I had fertility concerns that we had been trying for over a year...), my next told me "no need to drive all the way here to see me, you're having a miscarriage" when I had seen a heartbeat on the u/s in the ER the night before... And this one because we moved to a different state, and I totally love her.

    Long story short, they work for you, if you aren't happy, feel free to take your money elsewhere!
    claireloSCChrissyD1203
  • SovvySovvy member
    Oh I would be out of there so quick.
    image

    pregnancy #1 :: daughter lost to chromosomal abnormality at 18 weeks
    pregnancy #2 :: son, born Aug 2011
    pregnancy #3 :: due Jan 2016
    Leah6120
  • enkbenkb member
    Also on team find a new doc. To me the most concerning thing is that you said he directs every question you are having back to these pills. That doesn't sound like good prenatal care to me, you spend so little face to face time withthe dr that even 1 appt of missing getting real, non-financial gain influenced 'recommendations' from him sounds like too many for me. Personally I would change now rather than trying to convince him again you are not interested and risk missing another appointment worth of real info. Plus I'm super non confrontational and for me it would be easier to find a dr I was a better fit with than fighting to get one to change his practice at every appt. Good luck!
  • I use essential oils. I do NOT tell people they will cure everything that ails them. It's the fact that he recommends it for *everything* she asks about that has me concerned. I would tell him you're not interested and if he keeps bringing it up, switch to someone else.
    CaraBoonieChipMonster
  • claireloSCclaireloSC member
    edited July 2015
    I'm sorry, but this just isn't true. Homepathic remedies have been proven to have no effect besides the placebo effect. It's completely fine if people want to use them, but NO reputable doctor should be recommending them as a legitimate course of treatment. Some homeopathic methods are dangerous, some are not. What is dangerous is when doctors prescribe things we know don't work instead of things that we know do. A board certified doctor should not prescribe anything that has not been proven to be effective. You can actually lose your medical license for this. Some rando supplements are not a legitimate way to treat pregnancy symptoms. OP deserves real care from a doctor who doesn't have an agenda. 

    Emott13 said:
    While I understand your guys concerns, just because Dr Oz supports something or the FDA doesn't approve something doesn't mean it's a crock. The FDA monitors and controls a VERY SMALL amount of substances, and has no say in how things are marketed if they're considered "homeopathic" or "natural" remedies. For instance, I know many women on this site use essential oils which are supported by nearly every "quack" TV doc and are not FDA regulated or approved. Does that mean they are dangerous/don't work? It's not my place to say, as I don't use them. The doctor may be getting kick-backs, but I assure you no doctor would agree to market something that they hadn't personally tried or seen evidence of results from. I don't think you need to rush to see a new OB. This one is probably fine, and just found a new supplement that he's excited about and wants to share with patients. Just let him know your opinion and if he doesn't respect your boundaries, THEN think about changing. But only if you don't like him on a professional or personal level. A doctor is supposed to push treatments. That's what they're there for, to help you feel your best.

    Baby Birthday Ticker TickerMarried DW <3 08.2013; AI 2x; IUI 6x; IUI #7 05.2015; DD born 2.2016 o:); Reciprocal IVF FET #1 on 11.18.2020 
    Beverly0628nackie
  • Dr. Oz is a reputable surgeon and I would maybe even trust him to cut into me...
    But his show and media persona are bunk, and Columbia hospital has written that it reflects badly on him as a doctor and their hospital/med school.

    Basically he was (maybe is) a good doctor who sold out, which is not cool for somebody you're supposed to trust your health with.

    BabyFruit Ticker
    Leah6120
  • Agree with PP.. aside from the annoying salesman tactics, it's concerning that these supplements are somehow part of the solution to all of your questions. Not appropriate behavior from your physician to make you listen to this spiel at every visit, and does not sound like he is really listening or putting your needs first. Good luck however you decide to handle this. I hope you feel more comfortable with your care either by having a blunt conversation with your doctor or by switching to another
    ChrissyD1203
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