Working Moms

Need advice

I just found out today that I am getting a 10% raise to bring me in line with market and my peers.  this is coming after I brought up the subject with my supervisor that I did not feel as though I was receiving enough for the work I do - did this shortly before I went on maternity leave (have been back 1 week now).  However, I still feel shorted.  I know based on salary.com and glass door; job postings on indeed and 2 direct peers I am still not where I think I should be.  What would you do? Come back with a number you will accept - and support how you determined that number/range. Ideally I want $10k more which I know is a lot to ask for - but to sum it up if I were to get a job at another company doing what I do that would be what they would pay if not more.
TTC. 5/2011.

ME 34 DH 39.

Male factor infertility - erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, 1% morph.

3/12 IUI #1 (clomid 50 mg+ trigger) = BFN.

4/12 IUI #2 (clomid 150 mg+ trigger) = BFN.

5/12 IUI #3 (clomid 150 mg+trigger) = BFP


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Re: Need advice

  • Unfortunately, switching companies almost always nets you more money vs staying where you are.  You can ask for more but are you prepared to leave if they say no?
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  • You asked for a raise and they proposed an amount -- why wouldn't you counter that offer with something else, particularly if you have research to back it?
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  • This is what I am planning on doing.  just wanted to see if anyone had any advice to share before doing so.
    TTC. 5/2011.

    ME 34 DH 39.

    Male factor infertility - erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, 1% morph.

    3/12 IUI #1 (clomid 50 mg+ trigger) = BFN.

    4/12 IUI #2 (clomid 150 mg+ trigger) = BFN.

    5/12 IUI #3 (clomid 150 mg+trigger) = BFP


    pregnancy calendar

    image

    image
  • image elmoali:
    Unfortunately, switching companies almost always nets you more money vs staying where you are.  You can ask for more but are you prepared to leave if they say no?
    This has been my experience too.  If you want that $10k, you may have to leave in order to get it. 

    And if you do go back w/ a counter, be careful how you word it.  if you say "I'll accept ___", that sounds like if you don't, you're leaving.  Are you ready to quit?  If not, then be careful how you present this.

    But again - realistically - you may have to plan on looking for a new job if they don't come up.

    "Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy."
    ~Benjamin Franklin

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  • emilypcemilypc
    250 Answers Fifth Anniversary 1000 Comments 500 Love Its
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    I would counter. Would finding a job elsewhere that pays you what you are worth be a bad thing? I know the devil you know is often better than starting fresh (especially with a new baby), but maybe that would be the best thing for you if your are not being fairly compensated.
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  • FemShepFemShep
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Second Anniversary First Answer
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    I really wouldn't bring this up 1 week after returning from maternity leave *and* after getting a 10% raise.  You may find that there are other things about this workplace (like being able to leave on short notice to pick up a sick kid at daycare) that are worth more than an extra raise.  Your boss may also be capped in the amount he can adjust a salary each year, and 10% is an excellent adjustment.

    I'm not saying that you should never negotiate your salary, just that your timing is not ideal, and that you need to be conscious of other things you may want from your boss/workplace that go beyond base salary. 

    If you do decide to move forward, I'd approach it in this way:

    "Thanks so much, manager, for going to bat to bring my salary in line with my peers.  According to Glassdoor and Salary.com, I'm still underpaid significantly.  I recognize that a 10% raise is significant, and I very much appreciate it.  I'd love to speak with you about how we can close the remaining gap."

    Keep in mind that your company may pay below market as a standard, and make it up with other benefits or perqs.  Also think about what this might do to your relationship with your boss, especially if you present your argument along the lines of "the number you'll accept".  And finally, think about the challenges of starting a new job with a very young infant at home. 

     


  • ilanatilanat
    Ancient Membership 100 Comments Name Dropper 5 Love Its
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    image FemShep:

    I really wouldn't bring this up 1 week after returning from maternity leave *and* after getting a 10% raise.  You may find that there are other things about this workplace (like being able to leave on short notice to pick up a sick kid at daycare) that are worth more than an extra raise.  Your boss may also be capped in the amount he can adjust a salary each year, and 10% is an excellent adjustment.

    I'm not saying that you should never negotiate your salary, just that your timing is not ideal, and that you need to be conscious of other things you may want from your boss/workplace that go beyond base salary. 

    If you do decide to move forward, I'd approach it in this way:

    "Thanks so much, manager, for going to bat to bring my salary in line with my peers.  According to Glassdoor and Salary.com, I'm still underpaid significantly.  I recognize that a 10% raise is significant, and I very much appreciate it.  I'd love to speak with you about how we can close the remaining gap."

    Keep in mind that your company may pay below market as a standard, and make it up with other benefits or perqs.  Also think about what this might do to your relationship with your boss, especially if you present your argument along the lines of "the number you'll accept".  And finally, think about the challenges of starting a new job with a very young infant at home. 

     

     

    Wow, this exactly.  I agree with this entire post.  I too know that I am underpaid, but I have other things with my job that make up for it: I am in control of my own day, I leave much earlier than my friends in other corporate jobs and I sincerely enjoy what I do.  One middle point way of dealing with the issue, since the timing is not ideal, is to perhaps suggest a scheduled review in 6 months that would assess benchmarks you and your boss would agree to now; if you make those goals, perhaps another bump in pay could happen or you could be rewarded with the end-of-year bonus.  

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  • Virgo17Virgo17
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    A agree with the couple of PP who said the timing is not ideal.  I think 10% is a great increase and they may not be authorized to do more than that at one time.  I would suggest asking if you can have a follow up discussion in 6 months to talk about it again.

    Also, as a new mother, you will definitely need to consider what your current job offers beyond money.  If you switch companies, you will likely not have the PTO and flexibility that you have now.  All of that needs to factor in.

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