3rd Trimester

NBR : my poor dog

My four year old dog that has been my baby, until you know the actual baby gets here, may have a tumor. I don't have the money to get him better so I may have to put him down. I'm not doing so well financially, and obviously baby comes before dog. I am so sad, I really was looking forward to my baby growing up with this dog. I can't help but cry right now. Why do we get so much stress at the worst times in life? :[

Re: NBR : my poor dog

  • I'm sorry to hear about your dog.  Maybe your vet could work out a payment plan?

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  • I am so sorry! Like pp said you should see if you could do a payment plan.
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  • Is the tumor cancerous? I think my parents dog used to get fatty tumors which were harmless! I'd talk to your vet about different payment options.  
  • Please do not put your dog down because you can't afford the vet bills. At the very least, try to find a no kill shelter or rescue that will take him. Or a responsible pet owner who can afford to take over his care. Dogs recover from tumors all the time. Even cancerous ones. I'm really sorry money is tight for you, but people putting their pets down just because they can't afford to pay vet bills is something that really bothers me.
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  • image bethparr1979:
    Please do not put your dog down because you can't afford the vet bills. At the very least, try to find a no kill shelter or rescue that will take him. Or a responsible pet owner who can afford to take over his care. Dogs recover from tumors all the time. Even cancerous ones. I'm really sorry money is tight for you, but people putting their pets down just because they can't afford to pay vet bills is something that really bothers me.

     I agree with this completely. Look into something called Care Credit. You can use it for your vet bills

  • The last place you want to take him is to a shelter! Do not listen to that post. They will access him and most likely find him un-adoptable.  Def see if your vet offers Care Credit.  Care credit is a line of credit that is for medical bills only (vet or regular) and most hospitals have this (you will have to have decent credit though to be able to apply and be accepted)  It really upsets me that people think about putting their pets down when it comes time to pay for their care.  

    Not to offend you, but you should be a responsible pet owner- the right thing to do is care for him, or you should not be a pet owner at all. A small mass can be a very easy fix, especially if caught early.  


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  • image Fixie:

    The last place you want to take him is to a shelter! Do not listen to that post. They will access him and most likely find him un-adoptable.  Def see if your vet offers Care Credit.  Care credit is a line of credit that is for medical bills only (vet or regular) and most hospitals have this (you will have to have decent credit though to be able to apply and be accepted)  It really upsets me that people think about putting their pets down when it comes time to pay for their care.  

    Not to offend you, but you should be a responsible pet owner- the right thing to do is care for him, or you should not be a pet owner at all. A small mass can be a very easy fix, especially if caught early.  


    Please note that I specifically suggested a "no-kill" shelter.  These shelters do not assess dogs, find them unadoptable, and euthanize them.  They do not euthanize animals at all.  I would agree that you should not take the dog to a regular shelter, but no-kill shelters are different.  There are fairly rare, though, so if you decide to go this route, make sure the shelter is, in fact, a no-kill shelter.

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  • image bethparr1979:
    image Fixie:

    The last place you want to take him is to a shelter! Do not listen to that post. They will access him and most likely find him un-adoptable.  Def see if your vet offers Care Credit.  Care credit is a line of credit that is for medical bills only (vet or regular) and most hospitals have this (you will have to have decent credit though to be able to apply and be accepted)  It really upsets me that people think about putting their pets down when it comes time to pay for their care.  

    Not to offend you, but you should be a responsible pet owner- the right thing to do is care for him, or you should not be a pet owner at all. A small mass can be a very easy fix, especially if caught early.  


    Please note that I specifically suggested a "no-kill" shelter.  These shelters do not assess dogs, find them unadoptable, and euthanize them.  They do not euthanize animals at all.  I would agree that you should not take the dog to a regular shelter, but no-kill shelters are different.  There are fairly rare, though, so if you decide to go this route, make sure the shelter is, in fact, a no-kill shelter.

    Do you know what kind of a life a dog leads in a shelter? Not to mention a no kill shelter---good luck finding one that is not full and able to accept another pet-- not to mention most no kill shelters have hardly any money.  My husband is a veterinarian and we have our own practice and we work with shelters all the time my husband volunteers his time and we are always bringing in needed supplies that people bring in to us they no longer need (food, beds, blankets)  I am not speaking just on opinion but on fact because I have experience with pretty much every type of scenario people encounter with their pets.  I work with shelters on a day to day business- trust me  leaving a home and going into a shelter of any kind would be terrible for a dog.   This is a member of your family, remember that. 

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  • Yes, as an owner of two dogs, I would re-mortgage my house before I put one of them down for a medical reason that might be able to be resolved.  I've spent thousands of dollars on their vet bills.  You don't have to lecture me about dogs being a member of the family...

    I agree that there are better options, but my only point is that a no-kill shelter is better than putting the dog down.  I also know two people who have gotten their dogs from no-kill shelters in the past year alone.  It certainly wasn't a mistake, at least for them.

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  • I should have been more clear in my post-- the question of what kind of life a dog leads in a shelter was directed towards the OP.  I have no doubt that you care about your dogs health and would do what you could to help them.  My frustration is towards the OP.  I know people who get dogs from all types of shelters all the time.  Just from experience alone, getting a dog accepted into a no kill shelter is very very rare-  because some of the dogs they have in there will never leave because they can't be adopted.  Not to mention-- can you imagine sending your dog to a shelter after living in a home with a family-- even if it was a no kill? How awful for them.  
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  • I also work in vet office and would highly recommend applying for Care Credit. This has been literally a life saver for some of our clients.

    Also I have to agree with Fixie about the "No Kill" shelters. Please believe me when I say that I would so much rather see a pet rehomed than euthanized!!! However alot of "No Kill" shelters are no longer 100% no kill anymore. Well atleast that's what we've begun to experience in our area. They are full to the max and the fosters have way more than their limit.

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  • I'm so sorry. I'm just starting to come out of the fog of sadness after putting my baby down on Thursday. He had two types of cancer. I removed the first tumor back in Aug. 2011 but the second tumor was on his kidney and was huge so we elected not to remove that one. (He was older and they weren't sure it would improve his life expectancy and recovery might have been difficult for him.)

    Dogs can live a long time with tumors. His kidney tumor was fast growing but he lived another 9 months until the tumor had taken over his entire abdomen.

    I know how you feel because I thought with both malignant tumors that he was going to die the next week. He didn't and he had a good life for several months afterward.

    You might be able to give yourself and your furbaby the extra several months until he or she starts showing the secondary symptoms (severe weight loss, loss of appetite, obvious signs of pain, etc.). My baby didn't go severely down hill until the last few weeks.

    I wish you the best in making your decision and I'm so sorry because I know how you feel.  

    RIP Mr Jamerson (my beagle) 


  • I am so sorry to hear about your dog. How heartbreaking. My animals are what I call my "fur babies." - Definitely members of the family.
    I wish I had the magic answer for you. Such a hard situation. Try to take some deep breaths though. Stress is not good for you, baby, OR the dog.
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  • Thank you to the ladies who showed sympathy, I appreciate it in this difficult time. I didn't post this to get lectured. A shelter is my very last resort because I don't want him going through that. I am looking for a home for him but because he's a pit bull, its hard. I applied for care credit, and was denied...my ex step dad used my ssn when I was younger with the wrong last name, making it impossible for me to get approved for anything. I'm spending as much time with my puppy as I can, I love him so much and I'm praying that its not serious and that he'll be okay.
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