Special Needs

Autism moms - how did you know?

How early did you have an idea?  What were your first signs.  LO is 8 months and I've noticed things, I just have this feeling.  

Re: Autism moms - how did you know?

  • I didn't have any inclination until my son was about 15 months; it wasn't until then that I noticed he wouldn't respond to his name and it almost seemed like he was purposely ignoring me. I knew it wasn't his hearing because he would run into the room whenever he heard the theme song to his favorite show. He wasn't picking up language and then I started to notice the other red flags - toe walking and hand flapping. I try to think back if there was anything in his earlier months that I missed. He was colicky - but I attribute that to a milk allergy and not autism. To me he was a typically developing baby. Now that I'm pregnant w/ 2, I hope I don't constantly over analyze everything this baby does / doesn't do but I don't think I'll be able to help it. 
  • In retrospect, reading letters off signs at thirteen months should have been a red flag. Ditto memorizing and reciting entire books at sixteen months. I said around that time that he was cruising toward an Asperger's diagnosis or that at a minimum he would struggle socially. He passed his M-CHAT at eighteen months. I didn't start freaking out until I noticed how much of his speech was echolalic compared to verbally advanced peers. Throw in toe walking, failure to respond to his name, seeming deafness, minimal eye contact, freaking out over transitions, an obsession with wheels, random yoga poses in group settings, etc. We got a formal diagnosis very early, the day before he turned two.

    More relevant to your situation: when I look at his baby videos now things jump out at me, but he was my first and I didn't know any better. My MIL, though, said something was off with his eye contact at one month. He still fails the head lag test, which I wish we'd known about then (http://www.kennedykrieger.org/potential-online/potential-fall-2012/infant-head-lag-autism). He was always an "easy" baby, which was probably related to his hyposensitivity to sensory input. 
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    11/10/10 Kid A

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  • I knew at 2 something was off. About her third birthday I could say I knew for sure. I did wonder why she was a difficult baby, why everyone else had babies that were so different than mine.
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    Olivia Kate is almost 4!
    Diagnosed with autism this year and doing great!
  • Joshua is 8 mOnths now. My fear began when he didn't really smile until 7 weeks.  I googled and autism is what came up.  He flaps his hands when sitting or standing holding on with the other hand.  He has been pretty calm and quiet as a baby, more of an observer.  He does however, smile, giggle, respond to his name, and makes great eye contact.  He has been talking more and more since 5 months.  A lot now.    He is sitting, but doesn't crawl. Can get on all fours.  I'm obsessing over it lately.  I analyze every move.  I'm not sure if I'm being crazy or it's an instinct. 
  • My daughter hasn't been diagnosed yet.  But I began to have concerns when she was fifteen months old.  Isla is very social and happy and loving....but her joint attention was bad.  It was very hard to get her to play with you.  Anything not initiated by her was ignored.   She had never said "mama".  There were other things, but basically I just felt it.  It was like I just knew.
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    "Although you see the world different than me, sometimes I can touch upon the wonders that you see." -Carole King "Child of Mine"

    " Mike Huckabee needs someone to tie his ass up and force him to watch gay porn at an abortion clinic while heavy metal music plays in the background." -my awesome friend
  •  I have to correct my earlier post because it's driving me crazy!! I meant "indication", not "inclination". 

    No joint attention was something I noticed too early on. He would move on to something else whenever I tried to engage him. Another thing was whenever I pointed at something (like a plane in the sky) he would look at my finger and didn't understand that I wanted him too look at the plane.

  •  I have to correct my earlier post because it's driving me crazy!! I meant "indication", not "inclination". 

    No joint attention was something I noticed too early on. He would move on to something else whenever I tried to engage him. Another thing was whenever I pointed at something (like a plane in the sky) he would look at my finger and didn't understand that I wanted him to look at the plane.

  • image jamisoncondie:
    Joshua is 8 mOnths now. My fear began when he didn't really smile until 7 weeks. nbsp;I googled and autism is what came up. nbsp;He flaps his hands when sitting or standing holding on with the other hand. nbsp;He has been pretty calm and quiet as a baby, more of an observer. nbsp;He does however, smile, giggle, respond to his name, and makes great eye contact. nbsp;He has been talking more and more since 5 months. nbsp;A lot now. nbsp; nbsp;He is sitting, but doesn't crawl. Can get on all fours. nbsp;I'm obsessing over it lately. nbsp;I analyze every move. nbsp;I'm not sure if I'm being crazy or it's an instinct.nbsp;


    He sounds pretty normal to me. Here is my experience with my DS who likely is on the spectrum, and my neurotypical DD.

    DS has been sensory averse pretty much since birth. He had colic and reflux, but was also extremely easily overstimulated. He got stranger anxiety at 3 months and kept it with adults other than DH and me until he was 3. He got separation anxiety at 9 months and kept it until 3.5. He became obsessed with all things with wheels at 9 months and still has that obsession. As a young toddler he would crash his cozy coupe because he would be leaning out the side watching the wheels instead of looking forward. He is highly sensitive to strong smells, loud noises, clothing textures, food textures, and proximity of other people. Until he went to preschool at 3.5, he completely flipped out if another kid got within a five foot radius of him. He has good and bad eye contact days, but is generally much better with it with adults than kids. In fact, for a long time he completely ignored kids and only wanted to play with and talk to adults. He didn't talk to a single kid in his class until February of last year, after extensive practice on how to initiate conversation and start a game. He generally thinks things that people do that are completely unrelated to him are people trying to bother him in someway. For example, if DD is crying, he thinks she is crying AT him to make his ears hurt. His response is to scream as loud asas he can with his ears covered soso thatthat he can hurt her ears too.

    He smiled at 6 weeks, wbich is within the range of normal. He pointed at 9.5 months. He did not babble until 9 months and at a year only had one word, but by 18 months he was talking like a two year old, and by two he was talking in paragraphs. He rolled at 2.5 months, tripod sat at 3, independently sat at 4, crawled at 7, and walked at 10 months. He was riding a two wheeler bike without training wheels on his 4th birthday.

    DD is neurotypical. Th e reason I am including her is for comparison sake. She smiled at 4 weeks, which is early I believe. She rolled at 9 weeks, was able to tripod sit just before 3 months, and was easily independently sitting at just before 4 months. She was friendly with everyone and didn't have any sensory issues. She didn't crawl until 10 months and didn't walk until 15. She also didn't babble until 9 months, but she quickly racheted up 12 words by her birthday. By 18 months she had about 70 words and a few two word phrases now and then. Then she stayed exactly thethe same verbally until the last week or so. She has separation anxiety, but it is at a normal intensity. The same with stranger anxiety.
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  • When DS got an Aspergers dx a few months before his 7th birthday I was shocked.

    I knew he wasn't like other kids in terms of intensity and development but suspected it was a function of superior intellect. In retrospect, he did have a number of red flags that perhaps would have triggered an earlier eval had he been born 10 years later. FWIW, his speech was ridiculously eary- first word around 10 weeks (we missed it, his dev pedi pointed it out on video), he had 2 word phrases at 6 months, full sentenses at 15 months. He had good eye contact, great joint attention and sailed through the MCHAT twice. He had subtle gross motor issues, but met most milestones at the usual time except for speech and fine motor which were early. He had an unusually high threshold for pain. Midl SPD issues. But probably the thing that stood out was his classic Asperger special interests. In addition to memorizing books and license plates, he knew pretty much everything about any steam locomotive he's ever seen.

  • Oh, auntie reminded me. At 21 months,we started taking DS to Gymboree classes to try to get him more comfortable with other kids. He refused to participate or speak when we were there, but we would come home amd he could completely recreate the class for us. All of the songs, dances, and little phrases the teacher said.

    He also had an entire CD of kids music, which is 46 songs long, memorized at 15 months. Even though he wasn't talking in phrases yet, he could sing every song.
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  • image futurebray:

     I have to correct my earlier post because it's driving me crazy!! I meant "indication", not "inclination". 

    No joint attention was something I noticed too early on. He would move on to something else whenever I tried to engage him. Another thing was whenever I pointed at something (like a plane in the sky) he would look at my finger and didn't understand that I wanted him too look at the plane.

    It's so funny because my DD just had her OT write on a report she has fantastic joint attention. Every kid is so different. In our autism moms group most of our kids have some overlapping issues but mostly seem so different from one and another!

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    Olivia Kate is almost 4!
    Diagnosed with autism this year and doing great!
  • We don't have a Dx yet, but we have an evaluation next month for it. 

    Our first and main red flag is speech regression. DS started talking at 9.5 months saying Da-Da, Mama, and Bye Bye. One month later at 10.5 months he completely stopped talking. He did not talk again until 18 months when he said Da-Da, Mama, and No each 2-3 times within a 2-3 period. After those couple days of talking he went silent again.

    He is now 26 months and still non verbal. He does not babble (and never really has), just a lot of grunting. 

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  • Coming in late, but I always knew Trevor was a bit different. Couldn't really put my finger on what was different, but I knew he was on the spectrum even though everyone told me not to worry. He did not say mama until 3.5 yo, but the only dx he was given was Apraxia of speech. We received the dx of PDD- NOS just last year and I was strangely relieved . We are now able to get him the correct services. He is also sensory seeking and sensitive. HE likes tight hugs and banging his had on a large exercise ball, but is sensitive to noise. Trevor is also dx with ADHD. 
  • I knew around 9mo, more sure at a year. Took until 2 for the dr to admit it. He was doing some obsessive things, spinning toys, head banging, not talking other than mama. His eye contact wasn't noticably bad and he was affectionate. He's 5 now and is high functioning. Trust that instinct and keep an eye on it. Early intervention is best. :)
    Mom of 3 boys.
    7-11-2007 (has Autism),
    2-26-2009 to 11-2-11 (had cancer at 4mo),
    3-28-2011 and
    Baby due 9-10-2013
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