March 2013 Moms

Breast feeding

DH and I have a breast feeding preparation class tonight. We are FTPs of course. I'm slightly nervous but excited. Has anyone been to a class like this? Is there anything I should be prepared for?

Re: Breast feeding

  • No advice for the class - they will just tell you what to expect and how best to prepare...but I will say this: I was shocked to learn that your nurses and lactation consultants will do whatever it takes to get your baby to latch...even if that means squeezing, slapping or shaking your nipple.

    So have fun with that!

  • MillerMama13, are you in Georgia by any chance? I just called to see when our hospital offers breastfeeding classes and the next one is tonight at 7 :-)
  • image jenniferraborn:
    MillerMama13, are you in Georgia by any chance? I just called to see when our hospital offers breastfeeding classes and the next one is tonight at 7 :


    Nope, we're in central IL. That's a crazy coincidence though. Our class is from 68 tonight and next Thursday also.
  • My advice would be to do some research on your own as well. For some reason, there is a lot of conflicting info out there about breastfeeding (esp among hospitals). Many will tell you to supplement with formula till your breastmilk comes in, or that using a pacifier is ok right away (both will mess up breastfeeding!). I found way more helpful info from talking to breastfeeding moms and reading lots of books, although the class was good for some basic info.


  • Just have the two of you focus on what the latch looks like and ways to get it.  But don't let them stress you about it.  After Lo is born, it's easier once you have your baby there so ask if there is a way to contact them after baby is born if you have questions.
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  • image mel8255:
    No advice for the class they will just tell you what to expect and how best to prepare...but I will say this: I was shocked to learn that your nurses and lactation consultants will do whatever it takes to get your baby to latch...even if that means squeezing, slapping or shaking your nipple.
    So have fun with that!


    Yes, they do! I was not prepared for that!

     

  • Just try to remember that this is totally natural and you and your baby will figure out what works best for you. Try your best to let go of expectations put on by everyone else and yourself. If your body responds and it works great, if not don't stress. I think there is so much hype out there about breastfeeding it makes it more complicated than it needs to be. Just try your best to relax and listen to your instincts. Good luck!
  • image DanandVan:

    My advice would be to do some research on your own as well. For some reason, there is a lot of conflicting info out there about breastfeeding (esp among hospitals). Many will tell you to supplement with formula till your breastmilk comes in, or that using a pacifier is ok right away (both will mess up breastfeeding!). I found way more helpful info from talking to breastfeeding moms and reading lots of books, although the class was good for some basic info.

    I second this advice.  My hospital is very breastfeeding friendly, so they don't provide pacifiers (you have to bring your own if you want one in the hospital), they encourage "kangaroo care," and babies sleep in the room with mom unless you specifically ask to send them to the nursery.  They also encouraged us in the class to make sure to find a pediatrician who is supportive of BFing.  I've noticed that baby care books that contain a BFing section often say the opposite of what we were told in our class about things like nipple confusion, so it is always good to consult more than one source and then see what makes sense and works for you.  I just finished reading Breasfeeding Made Simple by Mohrbacker and Kendall-Tackett and it backed up a lot of the things we learned in our class, with more detailed explanations of why some things do and do not work.

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  • I never knew or thought about the fact that pacifiers could mess with breastfeeding- so when does your baby start using pacifiers, if at all?
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  • Great info. I'm not going to stress too much about this. I want it to work but I have a feeling I'll be too much of a wimp. My mom told me to prep my nipples now by twisting and pulling for a while everyday to toughen them up. It hurts to do that even. I can only handle it for so long. So I will do my best but I'm not going to torture myself over it. We will see how it goes.
  • image Linzr0723:
    I never knew or thought about the fact that pacifiers could mess with breastfeeding- so when does your baby start using pacifiers, if at all?

     I don't think it necessarily messes with breastfeeding, however my daughter had no interest in paci's till about 5-6 months and it was only occasional and only lasted a few months or so... she never really cared about having one or not having one, it was more of a tool for me to use to soothe her when needed when we were out and about, lol.  I think that a bigger deal is made about nipple confusion than needs to be, but I'm only going off my experience, so who knows.  

    Also, I am delivering this baby in a different hospital than my first 2, and was a little surprised to learn they do not even HAVE a regular nursery - baby stays with you the entire time... which is good, I'd just never heard of it. 

     

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  • Huh, is it bad that I have absolutely no intentions of taking a class?  I have done a bit of light reading and feel that's adequate for my comfort level.  I'm sure they offer a lot of insight in the class, but it's also such a natural thing.  I figure I will meet with the LC if we need help.

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  • image CloudBee:

    Huh, is it bad that I have absolutely no intentions of taking a class?  I have done a bit of light reading and feel that's adequate for my comfort level.  I'm sure they offer a lot of insight in the class, but it's also such a natural thing.  I figure I will meet with the LC if we need help.

    I don't think so, as long as you are reading up on the subject (although I'm a FTM).  The couple of things I picked up in the class that might have been difficult to get from a book were the logistics of how the latch works and just general encouragement that if it doesn't work naturally, to consult an LC and not automatically give up in frustration.  Our instructor talked about how some people give up because they get bad advice or are pressured to do so by a pediatrician who isn't supportive of BFing.  At the hospital where I plan to deliver, there are multiple LCs on staff, so I can't imagine that someone who delivered there would not be able to get adequate help if needed, without ever having taken a class.   

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  • image mal922:
    image DanandVan:

    My advice would be to do some research on your own as well. For some reason, there is a lot of conflicting info out there about breastfeeding (esp among hospitals). Many will tell you to supplement with formula till your breastmilk comes in, or that using a pacifier is ok right away (both will mess up breastfeeding!). I found way more helpful info from talking to breastfeeding moms and reading lots of books, although the class was good for some basic info.

    I second this advice.  My hospital is very breastfeeding friendly, so they don't provide pacifiers (you have to bring your own if you want one in the hospital), they encourage "kangaroo care," and babies sleep in the room with mom unless you specifically ask to send them to the nursery.  They also encouraged us in the class to make sure to find a pediatrician who is supportive of BFing.  I've noticed that baby care books that contain a BFing section often say the opposite of what we were told in our class about things like nipple confusion, so it is always good to consult more than one source and then see what makes sense and works for you.  I just finished reading Breasfeeding Made Simple by Mohrbacker and Kendall-Tackett and it backed up a lot of the things we learned in our class, with more detailed explanations of why some things do and do not work.

     

    I third all of this.

     

    DH and I were glad we took the class. Ours was tought by an Internationally Certified Lactation Consultant that also works at the hospital. She gave each of us a little sign to put in the bed with baby that says "I eat at Mom's." So if LO has to go to the nursery for anything they are not allowed to give formula or pacifiers. Our hospital encourages "rooming together" so LO will be with us except for when the ped has to do exam and if it's a boy for the circumcision. DH was esp glad he went because now he knows how to he can really be supportative and ways that he can help and feel involved.

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  • image mal922:
    image CloudBee:

    Huh, is it bad that I have absolutely no intentions of taking a class?  I have done a bit of light reading and feel that's adequate for my comfort level.  I'm sure they offer a lot of insight in the class, but it's also such a natural thing.  I figure I will meet with the LC if we need help.

    I don't think so, as long as you are reading up on the subject (although I'm a FTM).  The couple of things I picked up in the class that might have been difficult to get from a book were the logistics of how the latch works and just general encouragement that if it doesn't work naturally, to consult an LC and not automatically give up in frustration.  Our instructor talked about how some people give up because they get bad advice or are pressured to do so by a pediatrician who isn't supportive of BFing.  At the hospital where I plan to deliver, there are multiple LCs on staff, so I can't imagine that someone who delivered there would not be able to get adequate help if needed, without ever having taken a class.   

    All of this is true. However, I still recommend taking a class. While BF'ing is definitely a natural thing it does not come naturally and it is not easy. I went to a class and did light reading and still felt like I should have done heavy reading lol.

    Thankfully, my hospital has the best LCs in the city and I didn't have to pay for their services (people who deliver at other hospitals do), so I took full advantage of them and they really helped me get my latch down before I left the hospital.

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  • I don't think it's necessarily a bad thing that you don't plan on taking a class.  I didn't have any interest in it either, and I'm 29 weeks pregnant STILL breastfeeding my 17 month old. :-)  If you feel like you're comfortable, go with it.  Don't freak yourself out over it.

    The LC I had with my daughter was great.  There was a lot I was not prepared for so it was great to have her.  I think the best advice I could offer is to expect difficulties and bumps in the road, but they will all pass. (and it's all worth the pain and discomforts that come in the beginning!)  Good luck! 

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