Toddlers: 12 - 24 Months

vaccinations

I am wondering if any of you ladies chose to separate your LO's vaccinations so they weren't getting so many at the same time? I really don't like the idea of giving DS so many at the same time even though the Dr. was very pushy about it. When I asked why we couldn't spread them out he replied "we don't want to give the kids shots every time they come in because they will be scared of the doctor" IMO that is not a legitimate reason..... what are your thoughts?
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Re: vaccinations

  • I follow my Pedi's advice and schedule. IMO, they are the Drs and I trust them and their care.
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  • I follow the schedule, but that doesn't seem like a valid reason...I mean I don't have wellness visits in between my shot visits, so she does get shots at every visit.

    I know there are some they can't split up bc I believe they are sold in combos, but if you're willing to go in more often, I don't see why they can't split them up for you. I'd find a new pedi if you're wanting someone more willing to be flexible with you on this.  

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  • We follow the CDC's schedule. Unless you have proven scientific/medical reasoning that surpasses the CDC's studies on why vaccines are given the way they are, then I think you should follow it too. 

    Dr. Sears is one quack who made up his own delayed schedule even though he has no training in vaccines and there is no proof that it is beneficial in the least. 

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  • I am not against vaccinations and plan to follow the schedules.... I am just stressing about it because DS got extremely sick from his 6 month shots and it was very difficult and worrisome for a couple weeks because he wasn't himself. I know he needs them I just want it to be easier on his body.
    ETA: I have never even heard of Dr. Sears
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  • I do follow an alternative vaccine schedule. I made my own based on the one Dr. Sears has in his book, though I don't believe he created it. I just think its better to not over load my LOs immune system with a lot of vaccines at once. So I break them up. He does receive all the vaccines just on a delayed schedule. Instead of the 4 he is supposed to get, he gets two then the next month I take him in just for shots and he gets two more.

     I feel this is the right choice for my son. Other people may disagree, but I don't care. The delayed schedule is not popular on the bump but it is in the area I live in. You have the right to choose what is best for your child. If you feel you would like to change the way your child is vaccinated then don't let your dr.'s lame excuse stop you.

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  • I think it would be better for him because he got so sick last time and ran a fever for 3 days! They kept telling me it was only supposed to make him sick that day, but they were wrong..... I just don't want to make him so sick when we could spread it out so it is easier for him.
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  • My pedi won't give babies more than two shots per visit. They come more often but receive less shots each time. I think it's completely reasonable to request something like this, especially if your child had a bad reaction in the past.
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  • image BabyKsMommy:

    I do follow an alternative vaccine schedule. I made my own based on the one Dr. Sears has in his book, though I don't believe he created it. I just think its better to not over load my LOs immune system with a lot of vaccines at once. So I break them up. He does receive all the vaccines just on a delayed schedule. Instead of the 4 he is supposed to get, he gets two then the next month I take him in just for shots and he gets two more.

     I feel this is the right choice for my son. Other people may disagree, but I don't care. The delayed schedule is not popular on the bump but it is in the area I live in. You have the right to choose what is best for your child. If you feel you would like to change the way your child is vaccinated then don't let your dr.'s lame excuse stop you.

    All the bolded.
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  • When we lived in Vermont our pedi automatically separated them into 12 and 15 month appointments. I completely forgot they did that and was surprised when I took DD to her 12 month appointment (in NC) and she got all 5. =( Had I remembered at the time I would have requested to separate them. I just think 5 is way too many at one time. All of the other months vaccinations don't bother me but that 12 month apt. really did. 


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  • I follow their schedule. Really though, pretty much every well visit DOES have a shot so...
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  • The recommended vaccine schedule is done so with significant research as to what shots will be most effective at the given time. In most cases, doctors use an already slightly delayed schedule; however, still recommend giving shots when they will be most effective.

    Doctors are not in the business of randomly giving shots just to displease babies and parents.  If you were to delay a shot, which one or ones do you suggest delaying? And what would happen if your LO contracted whatever, simply because you decided to delay a shot. Of course the probability is very low, but the point I am trying to make is that unless you went to 4 years of med school and 4 years through residency, or are a chemist who develops and researches medicines and vaccines, you may want to reconsider what you perceive as "legitimate". 

  • I don't like most alternative schedules because the time between shots is what is most effective for developing immunity. However, DS has autoimmune neutropenia, so we do have an alternative schedule. He gets all of his shots in the same intervals recommended by the CDC, he just doesn't get them all in one appt. He never gets more than two shots at a time. If there are more shots needed for that appt, we come back two weeks later to get the others. We had actually started out that way because reactions to vaccines are common in my family, and then we continued it because his immune system is easily overwhelmed. 
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  • I would much rather deal with a multitude of shots at once instead of having the shots spread out.
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  • We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.

    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  

    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 

    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 

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  • I believe it is important to get all vaccinations on schedule.  That being said, here is the link to the schedule recommended by the CDC and AAP:  http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-6yrs-schedule-pr.pdf

    Most vaccines after 12 months have a range of recommended ages, between 12-15 or even 12-18 months.  It's definitely possible to split the vaccines between the 12- and 15-month visits and still be on scedule.  Your pedi's reasoning is lame.

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  • I follow the schedule for the most part.

    They're the drs. they know what they're doing and I trust them. I also don't have the time, the time off or the energy to go to the dr. every week to have them spaced. I also can't afford all the dr. fees to do it that way.

    However, I will say at 12 months, LO got so many shots it was ridiculous (Like 6 of them). 3 or 4 I can handle no problem. 6 was a lot for anyone a baby most definitely. We all lived, but if I have more kids that series will be divided. (But I mean over the course of 2 visits in 2 weeks or something like that...not spaced a really long time out).

  • image dairygirl19:

    I follow the schedule for the most part.

    They're the drs. they know what they're doing and I trust them. I also don't have the time, the time off or the energy to go to the dr. every week to have them spaced. I also can't afford all the dr. fees to do it that way.

    However, I will say at 12 months, LO got so many shots it was ridiculous (Like 6 of them). 3 or 4 I can handle no problem. 6 was a lot for anyone a baby most definitely. We all lived, but if I have more kids that series will be divided. (But I mean over the course of 2 visits in 2 weeks or something like that...not spaced a really long time out).

    I guess my Dr already spaces them according to this... DD got 2 shots at 12 months and 2 at 15 months.  Some vaccinations were combined though.  For example she only got 2 shots at 15 months but it covered 3 vax.

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  • image LalaMama81:

    We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.

    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  

    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 

    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 

    This is very well stated.  We delay shots as well, but aside from MMR which they get a yearish late, everything is within a couple of months AND at the spacing recommended by Canada Health - which by the way has a different schedule then the States.  So not only is the AAP/CDC schedule not the only way, I think you can safely say that because each country vaccinates differently and at different schedules, if you choose a different schedule it likely won't impact your child in a negative way.  It may impact your doctor relationship negatively though.

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  • image dhviel:
    image LalaMama81:

    We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.

    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  

    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 

    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 

    This is very well stated.  We delay shots as well, but aside from MMR which they get a yearish late, everything is within a couple of months AND at the spacing recommended by Canada Health - which by the way has a different schedule then the States.  So not only is the AAP/CDC schedule not the only way, I think you can safely say that because each country vaccinates differently and at different schedules, if you choose a different schedule it likely won't impact your child in a negative way.  It may impact your doctor relationship negatively though.

    Unfortunately, there are a lot of variables that go along with your statement as disease rates vary greatly from country to country. By your logic, it would be okay for one in the US to use a vaccine schedule from Thailand just because it exists (e.g., malaria isn't common in the US but is in Thailand). However, some vaccines given in one country may actually not be given in another countries and vice versa. Hence the reason why different countries have different schedules.

    Again, another reason not to seek medical advice over the internet from people outside of the industry. 

  • image agytay:
    image dhviel:
    image LalaMama81:

    We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.


    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  


    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 


    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 



    This is very well stated.  We delay shots as well, but aside from MMR which they get a yearish late, everything is within a couple of months AND at the spacing recommended by Canada Health - which by the way has a different schedule then the States.  So not only is the AAP/CDC schedule not the only way, I think you can safely say that because each country vaccinates differently and at different schedules, if you choose a different schedule it likely won't impact your child in a negative way.  It may impact your doctor relationship negatively though.

    Unfortunately, there are a lot of variables that go along with your statement as disease rates vary greatly from country to country. By your logic, it would be okay for one in the US to use a vaccine schedule from Thailand just because it exists (e.g., malaria isn't common in the US but is in Thailand). However, some vaccines given in one country may actually not be given in another countries and vice versa. Hence the reason why different countries have different schedules.

    Again, another reason not to seek medical advice over the internet from people outside of the industry. 



    Comparing the US Canada is completely different than the US versus Thailand. I don't think anyone is suggesting to use a vaccine schedule for Uganda or China here.

    If no one asked medical related posts on the bump, that would probably eliminate more than half of the posts.
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  • Yes, I break them up and only give 2 at most at one appt. then about 2 weeks later give the rest. I am separating the chicken pox and the mmr and not sure if I'm getting flu shot. My dr wants me to do together, but is great about letting me do them when I want them and how I want them. It's your child and have that right! It seems like an awful lot of vaccinations to give a baby the way they haven't all set up. 

  • We follow the recommended schedule; we've never had a problem with it.

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  • image Blondangel:
    image BabyKsMommy:

    I do follow an alternative vaccine schedule. I made my own based on the one Dr. Sears has in his book, though I don't believe he created it. I just think its better to not over load my LOs immune system with a lot of vaccines at once. So I break them up. He does receive all the vaccines just on a delayed schedule. Instead of the 4 he is supposed to get, he gets two then the next month I take him in just for shots and he gets two more.

     I feel this is the right choice for my son. Other people may disagree, but I don't care. The delayed schedule is not popular on the bump but it is in the area I live in. You have the right to choose what is best for your child. If you feel you would like to change the way your child is vaccinated then don't let your dr.'s lame excuse stop you.

    All the bolded.

    I also agree with the bolded above.  My DD's dr and I discuss the shots that are to be given and decide which ones she will get now and which she will get later.  We delay for 1 month and then catch her up.  We won't do the flu shot.  Other than that, she has had and will have all of her shots within a month or so of the suggested time to get them. 

    If  my pedi was insistent on following the CDC schedule, I'd find a new pedi. 

  • image LalaMama81:
    image agytay:
    image dhviel:
    image LalaMama81:

    We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.

    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  

    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 

    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 

    This is very well stated.  We delay shots as well, but aside from MMR which they get a yearish late, everything is within a couple of months AND at the spacing recommended by Canada Health - which by the way has a different schedule then the States.  So not only is the AAP/CDC schedule not the only way, I think you can safely say that because each country vaccinates differently and at different schedules, if you choose a different schedule it likely won't impact your child in a negative way.  It may impact your doctor relationship negatively though.

    Unfortunately, there are a lot of variables that go along with your statement as disease rates vary greatly from country to country. By your logic, it would be okay for one in the US to use a vaccine schedule from Thailand just because it exists (e.g., malaria isn't common in the US but is in Thailand). However, some vaccines given in one country may actually not be given in another countries and vice versa. Hence the reason why different countries have different schedules.

    Again, another reason not to seek medical advice over the internet from people outside of the industry. 

    Comparing the US Canada is completely different than the US versus Thailand. I don't think anyone is suggesting to use a vaccine schedule for Uganda or China here. If no one asked medical related posts on the bump, that would probably eliminate more than half of the posts.

    Clearly, you are missing the point. Why is it okay to compare the US to Canada vs. the US and Thailand? If you are uncomfortable with Thailand, then compare the schedules for the US and Mexico, after all, it is another North American country.

    My point still stands, one should only go by suggested guidelines for what is recommended in *their* country/region, as variables are all over the place. Using anything else is like comparing apples to oranges. It is even mind boggling how can one even begin to refute that?

  • DD is and will always be vaccinated, but we follow an alternative schedule. Mostly because I don't feel that she should have more than 2 shots at a time. I mean, I wouldn't want more than 2 at a time so why would I let that happen to DD? My doctor knew my concerns from the beginning and was totally on board. I'd rather pay the extra copay every time then have her receive too many vaccinations at once. Completely our personal choice and it works for us.
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  • image agytay:
    image LalaMama81:
    image agytay:
    image dhviel:
    image LalaMama81:

    We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.

    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  

    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 

    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 

    This is very well stated.  We delay shots as well, but aside from MMR which they get a yearish late, everything is within a couple of months AND at the spacing recommended by Canada Health - which by the way has a different schedule then the States.  So not only is the AAP/CDC schedule not the only way, I think you can safely say that because each country vaccinates differently and at different schedules, if you choose a different schedule it likely won't impact your child in a negative way.  It may impact your doctor relationship negatively though.

    Unfortunately, there are a lot of variables that go along with your statement as disease rates vary greatly from country to country. By your logic, it would be okay for one in the US to use a vaccine schedule from Thailand just because it exists (e.g., malaria isn't common in the US but is in Thailand). However, some vaccines given in one country may actually not be given in another countries and vice versa. Hence the reason why different countries have different schedules.

    Again, another reason not to seek medical advice over the internet from people outside of the industry. 

    Comparing the US Canada is completely different than the US versus Thailand. I don't think anyone is suggesting to use a vaccine schedule for Uganda or China here. If no one asked medical related posts on the bump, that would probably eliminate more than half of the posts.

    Clearly, you are missing the point. Why is it okay to compare the US to Canada vs. the US and Thailand? If you are uncomfortable with Thailand, then compare the schedules for the US and Mexico, after all, it is another North American country.

    My point still stands, one should only go by suggested guidelines for what is recommended in *their* country/region, as variables are all over the place. Using anything else is like comparing apples to oranges. It is even mind boggling how can one even begin to refute that?

    Well, I am not the one who supposedly compared them in the first place, I was merely trying to point out that yes, there is a greater difference between Thailand  and the US than Canada and the US when it comes to preventable, infectious diseases. Are there vast differences, generally speaking, between the US and Canada regarding infectious disease?

    A very quick search shows similar schedules between the 2, but after a quick look at the WHO's guidelines for Thailand, Mexico & China, there are several diseases/vaccines mentioned that do not appear on the US or Canadian schedules.

    Regardless, I am not saying anyone should use the schedule for another country, regardless of similarities, to vaccine their child. 

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  • They're not that bad, but shots do hurt, and having all the vaccinations with fewer shots is better in my books... plus, if you have a fighter (like me), she doesn't sit still for that many at a time. 

    As for having some visits where vaccinations are not given, my husband is in health care, and there is also a required wait time between when you can give the boosters so that they can be their most effective.  And that is always good.

  • The only one I delayed for DD was Hep B, as I felt her risk of getting that was very, very low. I wouldn't delay something like HIB.I'm glad I did, since she had a hard time w/ shots, but it was kind of a pain.

    With DS, we followed the schedule and had no problems. He weighed more--not sure if that made a difference.

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  • image agytay:
    image dhviel:
    image LalaMama81:

    We spread them out. If done correctly, so that the time period in between each shot in a specific series is still correct, you should not have any issues w/ efficacy. My children will still be fully immunized by the time they start preschool, but I see no need for 4 and 5 shots a visit.

    While extensive research is done on each vaccine and whether they can be given together, the schedule isn't set as is b/c Vaccine A works better when you give Vaccine B at the same time. They schedule is set based more on a public health policy issue - essentially, more well-visit checks are made and kept for an infant and younger child and as they get older, those visits might be forgotten or spaced out further. There are socioeconomic factors, etc. The goals is to have the greatest number of children fully-immunized and they know if the schedule is such that the vaccinations are packed in more densely in the younger years, more kids will get them.  

    And no I didn't go to medical school, but my pharmaceutical research chemist husband agrees w/ me completely. 

    I think the fact that there are pedi's out there that routinely spread the shots out, shows that the CDC guideline isn't necessarily the best way and certainly not the only way. 

    This is very well stated.  We delay shots as well, but aside from MMR which they get a yearish late, everything is within a couple of months AND at the spacing recommended by Canada Health - which by the way has a different schedule then the States.  So not only is the AAP/CDC schedule not the only way, I think you can safely say that because each country vaccinates differently and at different schedules, if you choose a different schedule it likely won't impact your child in a negative way.  It may impact your doctor relationship negatively though.

    Unfortunately, there are a lot of variables that go along with your statement as disease rates vary greatly from country to country. By your logic, it would be okay for one in the US to use a vaccine schedule from Thailand just because it exists (e.g., malaria isn't common in the US but is in Thailand). However, some vaccines given in one country may actually not be given in another countries and vice versa. Hence the reason why different countries have different schedules.

    Again, another reason not to seek medical advice over the internet from people outside of the industry. 

    There are a lot of variables yes, and I'm not saying to use a schedule from a different country.

    Other then that LalaMama81 said everything else that needs to be said.

    Daughter #1 - February 12, 2010 

    natural m/c March 11, 2011 at 8 1/2 weeks 

    Daughter #2 - January 11, 2012 

    Ectopic pregnancy discovered November 6, 2012 at 6 weeks

    Daughter #3 - January 19, 2014

    Started our exploration into the world of international adoption June 2012.  We have no idea what this is going to look like but we are excited to find out!

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  • We follow our pedi's schedule.  He bases off the CDC/AAP stuff and then shfits slightly to keep it to 2-3 shots per visit.  DS got 3 at his 12 month appt I think and that was the most he'd had at one time.  We've never had a problem.

    I think OP's doctor's response was lame.

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