Breastfeeding

Pumping question

Ok I'm sort of at a lost because this didn't happen with my first LO. I made the decision to stop breastfeeding because I LO wasn't latching on and getting enough from me and became very dehydrated. Then my boobs starting to swell, hurt, and leak so I was going to try to pump. To my surprised I got alot of colostrum, I thought maybe I could pump and give him what I get in addition with the formula.

Like I said this didn't happen last time so I'm at a lost for how much should I pump? So far I only pump when I feel swollen and all that I seem to be getting is about 3oz of colostrum from both brest. It's been about 6 days so I think my milk should have came in but it's not. Is it because I'm not pumping enough?

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Re: Pumping question

  • To build a supply to fully replace breastmilk, you should pump a minimum of 7 times per day, for a minimum of 15 minutes per session (8-10 times per day is even better).  Are you sure that what you are getting is colostrum and not milk?  3 oz sounds like a lot of colostrum. 

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  • Your first mature milk is yellowy in color. I doubt its colostrum as well. Here's a pic. Both are milk not colostrum. Do you still think its colostrum?

    week1 on left and week 3 on right

    image 

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  • Ms5586Ms5586 member

    image easjer05:
    To build a supply to fully replace breastmilk, you should pump a minimum of 7 times per day, for a minimum of 15 minutes per session (8-10 times per day is even better).  Are you sure that what you are getting is colostrum and not milk?  3 oz sounds like a lot of colostrum. 

    This, exactly.  Exclusively pumping is very doable.  It's kind of double the work, but you can't argue with the fact that you're still giving your baby breastmilk.  I agree with PP, that if you're getting 3 oz total, it's probably milk. 

    I started out pumping every 2-3 hours, for 10 minutes (it's all I could handle, my nips would start to hurt), then I worked up to 12 minutes, then 15. 

    imageImage and video hosting by TinyPic

    image
  • At 1 week, 3 ounces is a lot and is milk...colostrum is usually only a few ml.  I started out EP because my Dd had sleepiness issues and was jaundiced and needed to eat...at 2 weeks we were able to make the transition back to the breast, so that is still a possibility for you if that's what you want (see a lactation consultant to help with the transition).

    I was told to pump every 2-3 hours for 20 minutes...I aimed for every 2 during the day and every 3 at night.  With a hands free bra (sports bra w holes cut over the nipples), I could pump and bottle feed LO at the same time, which actually made for faster night wake ups than the breast sometimes. 

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  • Ok I guess it is my milk. It is yellow in which I assumed it was the colostrum. Thanks
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  • AmyG*AmyG*
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    It looks like your baby is about a week or so old?

    If so, what happened with not latching and not getting enough/dehydrated, doesn't mean that would continue if you get help.

    so go see an IBCLC lactation consultant ASAP for help with getting baby latched on, and help with making sure baby is getting enough.

    alternatively, if you are goin to exclusively pump, a good LC can help you set up a schedule, make sure the pump you are using is good, right size flanges, and help with pumping enough milk as well.

    Until you can see an LC, I would do the following.

    spend a LOT of time with baby on your chest, skin to skin and see if baby will latch naturally.  a lot of babies are a bit traumatized by the whole birth thing, especially if they got suctioned right after delivery and it hurt.  so they may not really want to latch on cause their mouth hurts, but after a few days they heal and may show more interest in latching on.

    Every 2 hours for the next day or two, pump for at least 20 minutes.  preferably for 5-15 minutes after the milk stops spraying/squirting to signal a higher supply.  This is how often a newborn nurses.  You probably won't be able to keep up every 2 hours longer than about a day, cause it's tough.  so then go to every 2-3 hours during the day, and then every 3-4 hours at night.

    What is happening now is that you are waiting until you feel ultra full to pump.  so 1 it's harder to pump when you are totally engorged and 2 every time you get engorged it tells your body to make less milk.  this is a recipe to dry up your milk within the next couple days. 

    so it is imperative that if you want baby to have breastmilk, then pump religiously very very often every 2 hours to counteract the dry up your milk signal of the engorgement.

     

    AmyG*

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  • AmyG*AmyG*
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    image sarahmonster07:

    Ok I'm sort of at a lost because this didn't happen with my first LO. I made the decision to stop breastfeeding because I LO

     

    I kinda went over this part, in favor of the part about

    image sarahmonster07:

    I thought maybe I could pump and give him what I get in addition with the formula. 

     

    but the real answer is this.

    1. if you want to nurse at the breast, what happened when baby was just born is not reason to totally quit breastfeeding.  get with an LC to see if there is hope to nurse baby directly.  that would be your easiest solution and it's not too late.  nipple shields (sort of like bottle nipples that fit over your nips tomake them look like a bottle) may help get baby to the breast and there are other tricks that LC's know.

    2. If you want to give breastmilk to baby in addition to formula, you can keep doing what you are doing and your milk will finish drying up soon and you will give only formula.  some women are able to pump just at certain times of day to give baby some breastmilk, but most can only do that if they've gone from full time nursing or pumping and then decreased to certain times of the day only as baby gets older. But you could try pumping only say in the daytime and giving that milk and formula at night if you don't want to do 24/7 pumping and see how that works for you if you are undecided.

    3. if you want to give baby a lot of breastmilk for a long time, then work on the increased pumping schedule I mentioned.  You can bring in a full milk supply and then have the option to continue to pump, get baby back to the breast or go to formula.  I'd still recommend you see an LC to see if there is help with latching but also help with pumping plans.

     

    so it's up to you, there are a lot of options.  I'd push to get baby back to the breast now that the dehydration is past and your milk is in.  but your answer may be different than mine.

     

    AmyG*

    I don't type posts; I type novels.

    I don't get tags, sorry.

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