3rd Trimester

Elective C-section

Anyone have an elective C-section? I'm going to bring this up at my next doctor visit and see if they'll agree to it.
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Re: Elective C-section

  • just curious, what makes you want a csection?

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  • image kjg5445:
    just curious, what makes you want a csection?

     

    I'm curious as well, because I can think of so many reasons why I would never want a c-section unnecessarily.

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  • I had an emergency C section.  I am having a planned C with this baby, as I am unfortunately not a good candidate for a VBAC.

    It's hard for me to imagine a scenaio where a non-medically necessary  C section would be preferred to a vaginal birth. 

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  • Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.
  • I did with my twins, based on the advice of my MFM doctor. My regular OB wanted me to wait and go into labor on my own, and try for a vaginal birth. But honestly, the thought of a c/s sounded better to me - especially since I'd heard enough about the double whammy with twins (one vaginal, one emergency c/s). Plus, my MFM wanted to take the girls due to IUGR issues they were having.

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  • I can understand this.  I had a horrible vaginal birth and recovery and completely dread doing it again. I have had issues "down there" ever since, like urinary incontinence and recurrent hemorroids, which I think are directly related to a vaginal birth.  Had I known then what I know now, I probably would have considered an elective c-section.  I have not brought up an elective c-section with my doctor this time, only because our insurance only covers 90% and c-section is more expensive for the hospital stay than a vaginal birth. 
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  • I will be discussing the option with my Dr. too.  If this baby gets too big (and I'm already measuring ahead) then I want a C-Section... I'm a petite person so for me I'd rather have the Dr.s scoop him out if he's bigger and avoid any complications.  Of course it depends on how big he gets.
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  • image Sheazier:
    Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.

    OK - well, perhaps you need another perspective!

    Inductions with the goal of a vaginal birth can also be scheduled.  No need to rush straight to C section.  Sure, it might be quickly as an actual procedure to have a C section rather than go through labor, but that's just a few hours difference, and the recovery is vastly different. 

    If unpredictability is a real issue for you, I have to say, having a child will rock your world!  Unpredictability is about to be the new normal!

    As far as recovery, a Csection is major surgery.  I could have made phonecalls the next day too.  But I was also taking painkillers...for a while!  I had to stay in the hospital 4 nights.  I had a series of staples in my abdomen, it took some time to heal.  I wasn't allowed to drive for THREE weeks.  Going up and down the stairs at my house was challenging. 

    Healing and recovering from a C section is more taxing on you physically.  It carries risks of surgery you won't have with a vaginal birth.  And leaves a scar.  I hear that you say it's inconvenient for a vaginal birth, but a C section is FAR from convenient.

    If your work is your reason, it's time to re-evaluate your priorities.

     

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  • We were lead to believe that we would be having a c-section. We have always measured larger than what I am, and due to the size of my husband it just seemed liek it was going to happen regardless.  I as well appeal more to teh idea of a c-section than vaginal birth.  Personally i would much rather deal with healing on my tummy than down there.  But i found out at our hospital tour this weekend, that even if a baby is measuring very large they will only schedule a csection if it's medically necessary.  She said that they would induce me and see how my body handles going into regular labor before a csection.. which to me stinks. only because then I have a greater chance of a double wammy as well.  to get how far in regular labor only to find out he/she won't fit and having tearing down there just to go get a csection anyways. the only part about our hospital i'm not happy with lol.
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  • image Janimal:

    image Sheazier:
    Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.

    OK - well, perhaps you need another perspective!

    Inductions with the goal of a vaginal birth can also be scheduled.  No need to rush straight to C section.  Sure, it might be quickly as an actual procedure to have a C section rather than go through labor, but that's just a few hours difference, and the recovery is vastly different. 

    If unpredictability is a real issue for you, I have to say, having a child will rock your world!  Unpredictability is about to be the new normal!

    As far as recovery, a Csection is major surgery.  I could have made phonecalls the next day too.  But I was also taking painkillers...for a while!  I had to stay in the hospital 4 nights.  I had a series of staples in my abdomen, it took some time to heal.  I wasn't allowed to drive for THREE weeks.  Going up and down the stairs at my house was challenging. 

    Healing and recovering from a C section is more taxing on you physically.  It carries risks of surgery you won't have with a vaginal birth.  And leaves a scar.  I hear that you say it's inconvenient for a vaginal birth, but a C section is FAR from convenient.

    If your work is your reason, it's time to re-evaluate your priorities.

     

    I agree with this. I completely believe it is your choice to do whatever you want with your body, so don't take this and me trying to judge you, but from someone who has had a c-section and watched many mothers go through both types of birth experiences I can say that every vaginal birth mama I have seen recovered and was doing normal activities MUCH sooner than those with a c-section. I'd schedule an induction if the timing is the issue. I'll be going in for my second c-section soon and am not looking forward to it. Not to mention my friends were able to get back in the gym withing a week, weaned off pain killers nearly immediatley and I was still waiting for the ok from my OB at 12 weeks to workout, and I had pretty much zero complications. And like pper said- if scheduling is an issue now, just wait till you have a child!

    I do know that some doctors will allow scheduled c-sections. In fact on of my friends did that and then she went into labor and had the baby 4 hours later and said it was a breeze, she said she was really glad she didnt make it to her scheduled c-section.

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  • Why is it when people say "I'm curious as to why you would do that" they almost always mean "tell me  your reasons so I can tell you why they're wrong"
  • Thank you for your perspective.  Work is my reason as my work is very important to me and my family.  I have been the lead attorney on a major deal that I've been negotiating for the past 5 months.  I am on a team with other attorneys, but I offer a unique industry perspective that the others do not have.  We are close to setting a closing date and, of course, I am due at the end of December - the absolute worst possible time as far as corporate deals are concerned.  Obviously the deal can be closed without me, but I have the best relationship with opposing counsel and it would be beneficial for all sides to have me there, at least on the phone, when papers are signed and clauses are being questioned for the 100th time at 11PM on Dec 31.  It is very important for my client that papers be signed by midnight, Dec 31.  I am due on Dec 30 and I really would like to be able to control the timing of this.  The firm is prepping for my absence and we've been running through things.  I will do whatever is in the best interest of the baby, but it's not like I am asking for some radical birth procedure that's never been done before.  I understand recovery is different for everyone.  Had I been able to predict the future, I would have timed the pregnancy differently!
  • image Janimal:

    image Sheazier:
    Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.

    OK - well, perhaps you need another perspective!

    Inductions with the goal of a vaginal birth can also be scheduled.  No need to rush straight to C section.  Sure, it might be quickly as an actual procedure to have a C section rather than go through labor, but that's just a few hours difference, and the recovery is vastly different. 

    If unpredictability is a real issue for you, I have to say, having a child will rock your world!  Unpredictability is about to be the new normal!

    As far as recovery, a Csection is major surgery.  I could have made phonecalls the next day too.  But I was also taking painkillers...for a while!  I had to stay in the hospital 4 nights.  I had a series of staples in my abdomen, it took some time to heal.  I wasn't allowed to drive for THREE weeks.  Going up and down the stairs at my house was challenging. 

    Healing and recovering from a C section is more taxing on you physically.  It carries risks of surgery you won't have with a vaginal birth.  And leaves a scar.  I hear that you say it's inconvenient for a vaginal birth, but a C section is FAR from convenient.

    If your work is your reason, it's time to re-evaluate your priorities.

     

    All of that! It's kind of annoying to me that some one would tell you this
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  • image Cebs222:


    We were lead to believe that we would be having a c-section. We have always measured larger than what I am, and due to the size of my husband it just seemed liek it was going to happen regardless.  I as well appeal more to teh idea of a c-section than vaginal birth.  Personally i would much rather deal with healing on my tummy than down there.  But i found out at our hospital tour this weekend, that even if a baby is measuring very large they will only schedule a csection if it's medically necessary.  She said that they would induce me and see how my body handles going into regular labor before a csection.. which to me stinks. only because then I have a greater chance of a double wammy as well.  to get how far in regular labor only to find out he/she won't fit and having tearing down there just to go get a csection anyways. the only part about our hospital i'm not happy with lol.

    Don't worry about tearing AND having a C section.  Tearing happens during actual delivery.  If you need a medically necessary C section, you won't get to that part.  I mean, if you squeeze out the head and tear, they don't push it back in and go for a C section!

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  • For me "healing down there" was a breeze after my vaginal birth. I would much rather be a little, and I mean a little, sore in my vagina than have to recover from serious abdominal surgery. Staples, pain medication, not being able to bend and move around, pick up my kids, etc. does not compare to what I went through after having my DD. 

    After I had my DD, ( and I realize that everyone is different) the only thing I took was vitamins my OB gave me. I didn't need any pain reliever, I was begging to shower immediately after and once home after 2 days couldn't wait to get out and go to the park for a walk. A girlfriend from work woke up to her whole family already having met her baby after her CS and barely being able to move let alone carry her daughter or bend up and down for things for a good week.

    ETA: I should have quoted a PPer. Whoops.

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  • image PandaMom06:

    For me "healing down there" was a breeze after my vaginal birth. I would much rather be a little, and I mean a little, sore in my vagina than have to recover from serious abdominal surgery. Staples, pain medication, not being able to bend and move around, pick up my kids, etc. does not compare to what I went through after having my DD. 

    After I had my DD, ( and I realize that everyone is different) the only thing I took was vitamins my OB gave me. I didn't need any pain reliever, I was begging to shower immediately after and once home after 2 days couldn't wait to get out and go to the park for a walk. A girlfriend from work woke up to her whole family already having met her baby after her CS and barely being able to move let alone carry her daughter or bend up and down for things for a good week.



    To be fair - these are two VERY extreme circumstances.  Most people don't "wake up" from a c-section, since they're awake throughout the procedure.  I held my son as soon as I was stitched up, and the only people who saw him were nurses and DH and myself.  I also had a fantastic recovery - most people with crap recoveries had labored for hours on end, and their bodies either give out in the end or there's fetal distress, etc.  I have no complaints about my c-section, at all, and have no urge to VBAC.  I was climbing stairs as soon as I got home, three days later, and went about my business as normal as I had no need for painkillers.  Two girlfriends of mine, whose last babies were twelve and four years ago... they still pee themselves if they laugh too hard, and had horrible issues with sex because of tears.  There's another real, but again, extreme point of view.

    That being said, I went in prepared for a vaginal delivery.  Optimally, you want your child to come out when he/she is ready, according to their own schedule - not yours.  Unless you're doing invasive testing, you won't know when your baby's lungs are mature - your baby and your body will.  You may very well go early, or late, and as long as you aren't in transition labor, you can talk on the phone if you have an epidural.  Either way, risking not being on that phone call, and trusting your colleagues (who you should be preparing for this)  is a better option that risking the health of your child.
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  • Well, you can't completely control the timing, even with a plannd C section!

    I think this may be a premature decision -- a lot can happen. 

    At 37 weeks, if your baby has not arrived, that's fullterm which means if you go into labor naturally, the Drs won't try to stop it as your baby should be ready for the World.  However, that doesn't mean it's a good idea for baby's to be yanked out at 37 weeks.  Those last few weeks can make the difference for lung development as to whether or not your baby heads to the ICU for a stay (and you don't get to hold them even) or whether or not they come home with you.  Which is why most Dr's won't consider inductions until at least 39 weeks.  I know that cuts it close for you - but I would be surprised if your Dr would be on board with trying to get the baby out sooner than that.  So even with a scheduled C section - you're looking at delivery the last week of the year.  Unless you have a Dr agree to deliver earlier and then you are adding risks related to your baby's lung development.  Doesn't sound like that risk is worth it.

    And again, you can try for an induction instead of a C section.  You'll be up and about MUCH sooner after a vaginal delivery and won't be on pain meds.  I would prefer my attorneys not be on pain meds while negotiating a deal for me!

    Perhaps wait and see.  First babies are more often late than early.  I personally worked up until my due date with DD and she was born 4 days late. 

    I admit, with my planned C section coming up, it is nice to have that planned.  But there is always the possibility he would come early so I have contingency plans.  Like you, my work is important.  I *get* that.  But I think you can likely manage to get your deal closed AND have a safe delivery without rushing into a C section.

    If you can somehow arrange to get this thing closed in mid December, that sounds ideal.  That way, you will likely still be pregnant and up and around.  And if you go into labor early, you'll have time to reschedule before the end of the year after the baby arrives.  Seems to be if it's that important for you to be there, that the closing should be arranged around YOUR schedule, not your baby delivery around the closing.....That may sound simplistic given the apparently complicated issues with your deal - but hey, if you can make that happen....

    Best wishes for whatever you choose. 

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  • image mandapanda78:
    Why is it when people say "I'm curious as to why you would do that" they almost always mean "tell me  your reasons so I can tell you why they're wrong"

    Probably because having a c-section for non-medical reasons is a little insane.

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  • Janimal - Thank you for your response.  I am working on getting the closing date moved up to mid-December for exactly the reasons you stated.  It would be ideal and then I could stop worrying about it when labor happens (I will be basking in both the "after birth" and "after deal" glows...I'll be simply radiant! haha).  I am trying to give some of the control over to a colleague and he seems open to the opportunity to lead given the circumstances.  At the end of the day, I can only control what I'm allowed to control and everyone will just have to deal with my absence accordingly.  I am just planning for "worst case scenario" - something I have been trained to do!  I thought maybe it would be worse to schedule a vaginal induction prior to my due date, since this is my first child.  Of course, my doctor will tell me what she thinks and we'll go from there.  I have the childbirth classes soon and will learn more there, as well.
  • Like one of the previous posts, I am having a second c-section and am not a good candidate for a VBAC. Honestly my c-section recovery was not as bad as I had expected and hope for the best again. Good luck to you with whatever you and your docotor decide.
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  • image mandapanda78:Why is it when people say "I'm curious as to why you would do that" they almost always mean "tell me  your reasons so I can tell you why they're wrong"
    Probably because having a c-section for non-medical reasons is a little insane. I am not so sure what is so insane about an elective c-section.  It seems like a good choice to me and was a good choice for several women I know.  It may not be your preference, but it is not an insane request. 
  • Beware-- if you ask for an elective c-section, it may very well be billed that way to insurance. I know a couple who did the same thing and ended up with a $35,000 medical bill thanks to their elective c-section.

    I had a c-section because my son was breech, so I do agree that there are a lot of nice things about c-sections. Having it planned, being rested beforehand, having everything controlled and relatively fast-- I'm not going to lie, it's nice. But on the downside, in my opinion, it destroys your body. I had a really hard time getting back into shape afterwards, and I never lost that c-section "flap" that you don't hear enough about and is so disgusting. If I knew how hard it would be to salvage my body, I might have tried harder to try and turn our breech baby.

    I think however your baby arrives is the way it was meant to be, but don't underestimate your body's ability to go through labor. If everything seems to be going right for a vaginal delivery, consider yourself lucky. 

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  • image Sheazier:
    Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.

    I had a vaginal delivery with my first and recovery was NOTHING.  I even had an episiotomy.  I can't imagine major abdominal surgery would be an easier recovery than a vaginal birth, but I guess I've never had a C-section to compare it to. 

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  • image overture:

    image mandapanda78:
    Why is it when people say "I'm curious as to why you would do that" they almost always mean "tell me  your reasons so I can tell you why they're wrong"

    Probably because having a c-section for non-medical reasons is a little insane.

    How delightfully presumptuous.

  • image ejgballerina:

    image Sheazier:
    Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.

    I had a vaginal delivery with my first and recovery was NOTHING.  I even had an episiotomy.  I can't imagine major abdominal surgery would be an easier recovery than a vaginal birth, but I guess I've never had a C-section to compare it to. 



    The issue is, everyone has different experiences.  You were lucky with your vaginal birth.  I was lucky with my c-section.  You can have horrible recoveries with either.  My only reason for (at least with a first time birth) preferring to try for vaginal is that I would think the baby and your body would know when they're ready better than a scheduled date.
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  • image l_elizabeth:

    Beware-- if you ask for an elective c-section, it may very well be billed that way to insurance. I know a couple who did the same thing and ended up with a $35,000 medical bill thanks to their elective c-section.

    I had a c-section because my son was breech, so I do agree that there are a lot of nice things about c-sections. Having it planned, being rested beforehand, having everything controlled and relatively fast-- I'm not going to lie, it's nice. But on the downside, in my opinion, it destroys your body. I had a really hard time getting back into shape afterwards, and I never lost that c-section "flap" that you don't hear enough about and is so disgusting. If I knew how hard it would be to salvage my body, I might have tried harder to try and turn our breech baby.

    I think however your baby arrives is the way it was meant to be, but don't underestimate your body's ability to go through labor. If everything seems to be going right for a vaginal delivery, consider yourself lucky. 

     

    Thank you, l_elizabeth - this is definitely a MAJOR concern as well.  Insurance has to pay for it or I'm not going to do it!  Thanks for bringing this up, I appreciate it. 

  • This is my first baby and I have having c-section because of previous surgeries. I am not looking forward to the c-section because I remember how hard it was the recover from my surgeries and this time I will have a baby. You seem interested in going back to work sooner so I will say this: Most of the doctor's in my area will not release you to go back to work with a c-section for 8 weeks and will not release you until 6 weeks for a natural birth. This all depends on if your company requires you have a medical release to come back to work. My work requires me to have a release, so I cannot come back for 8 weeks. Good luck with your decision.
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  • image missjulierenee:
    This is my first baby and I have having c-section because of previous surgeries. I am not looking forward to the c-section because I remember how hard it was the recover from my surgeries and this time I will have a baby. You seem interested in going back to work sooner so I will say this: Most of the doctor's in my area will not release you to go back to work with a c-section for 8 weeks and will not release you until 6 weeks for a natural birth. This all depends on if your company requires you have a medical release to come back to work. My work requires me to have a release, so I cannot come back for 8 weeks. Good luck with your decision.

    Thank you.  Fortunately, I have no such work release requirements.  I can work from the hospital, if I so choose.  I am on bed rest and am working now, though not as many hours, but that is by choice.  I could also take 12 weeks off paid leave if I choose.  Just the nature of the beast.  I am just worried about one deal in particular that is now set to close the day after my due date.  When that is closed, life will be less hectic and I can take some time off without guilt. 

  • image mandapanda78:
    How delightfully presumptuous.

    Maybe.  But I stand by what I said.  Having medically unnecessary surgery for reasons that have nothing to do with the present or future health of you or your baby is crazypants.

    To the OP...you're obviously an intelligent woman.  Do more research about c-sections.  I think that you'll find that the likely costs outweigh any likely benefits. 

    It's likely that you're setting yourself up for a more difficult time negotiating this deal...best case scenario, you will be recovering from surgery while caring for a newborn in the middle of this stressful work situation.  If you let the baby decide when he or she is ready, you will probably still be pregnant until 2012.  It seems like it would be playing better odds to risk that the baby will come right on your due date.  If the baby comes a few days earlier, you'll probably be much better able to handle work post-delivery than post-surgery.  Only some 5% of non-induced babies come on their due dates.  The average pregnancy for a first baby is 41 weeks and 1 day.  If you let your baby and your body decide, it's most likely that this deal will be settled when you go into labor and you can focus on your baby and get back to work more quickly.

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  • image RadicalDreamer143:
    image ejgballerina:

    image Sheazier:
    Several friends in my profession have indicated that they much preferred having a C-section to vaginal delivery.  Recovery was faster for them and labor was more convenient, as it was scheduled and relatively quick.  They were able to get back to work sooner - two of them were able to field client phone calls the day after labor while in the hospital.  Obviously, not all surgeries are the same, but I have heard positive things overall from these particular individuals.  I am taking a childbirth class in two weeks.  Being out of touch with the office for an unpredictable amount of time while going through a vaginal delivery is not in my best interest as far as work is concerned, but I will do it if it is medically necessary.

    I had a vaginal delivery with my first and recovery was NOTHING.  I even had an episiotomy.  I can't imagine major abdominal surgery would be an easier recovery than a vaginal birth, but I guess I've never had a C-section to compare it to. 



    The issue is, everyone has different experiences.  You were lucky with your vaginal birth.  I was lucky with my c-section.  You can have horrible recoveries with either.  My only reason for (at least with a first time birth) preferring to try for vaginal is that I would think the baby and your body would know when they're ready better than a scheduled date.

    I understand that.  But without having a medical reason for a C-section, I would much prefer to go the route of not having major surgery.

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