1st Trimester

RH negative blood type

Hi Ladies,

 Anyone here RH negative and have a healthy pregnancy? I had a miscarriage last week and learned I am RH negative (husband A positive) and feel like maybe that had something to do with it?? Anyone else go through this? Thanks..

Re: RH negative blood type

  • I am and had a great first pregnancy. I got the shot twice, once when I had bleeding at 8 weeks and then closer to my edd. I did have a m/c with my second pregnancy but I don't think being rh negative affected it
  • I had a cp and they gave me the shot. My OBGYN said I should have no problem with this time around. I am so sorry for your loss. I don't think it has anything to do with a mc. GL in the future
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  • If I'm remembering my Biology correctly, your rh factor only comes into play with the second and subsequent babies (if they are rh positive). Any bleeding experience will allow contact between baby and your blood, if baby is rh positive, your body will make antibodies for it - so when the next child comes along and it is rh positive your body will attack it. Though that is why they have the magical shot!
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  • It has nothing to do with your miscarriage. I am RH negative. All it really means is for you is that you'll have to get a shot during your pregnancy ( I got mine @ 28 weeks when I had my glucose tolerance test) and then another one when the baby was born. It's pretty common actually.
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  • The Rh shot is important if the fetus and the mother are opposite blood types.  The mothers antibodies will attack the fetus because they think it is a virus.  It's also necessary to have this shot...but it sucks if you don't know that you are Rh negative, mostly because you don't find this out until it's too late.

    With my very first pregnancy (years ago), I found out that I was Rh negative.  After the loss of the baby, too.  They gave me the Rh shot and said that any pregnancies I had would require it.  Obviously, I'm pregnant now, and had the shot the day after I had started spotting and was told I will get another at 28 weeks and again after the birth. My doc said that I was lucky enough that the spotting happened the day before because the shot is necessary within 3 days of spotting.  Where is that info in all the books??????

    I had forgotten all about that shot being required.  If I had remembered, I would have made every effort to get it as soon as possible after the BFP and not two weeks later.  I'm so sorry that you've suffered this loss.  Thoughts and prayers and lots of hugs. 

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  • I am and so far so good. I will get a shot at next appt. (I think) and again at delivery if I'm right.
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  • I am and I have a healthy baby girl! But yes that can have something to do with the loss of a pregnancy if you have never had RhoGam before (a shot) sometimes a MC is a cocktail of unfortunate things its not just one specific "thats the one reason" it happened. I am sorry for your loss.
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  • I'm O negative and Jake's dad is 0 positive. I had a healthy pregnancy with no complications. I got a shot around 28 weeks, then another one after having Jake.
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  • I'm RH neg and had two healthy pregnancies so far ... working on the 3rd now.

    Most of the time you will get a shot around 28 weeks and again after birth if the baby is positive.  Never had a shot earlier than that.   

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  • Thank you so much ladies for your feedback...its comforting knowing that most of you had healthy pregnancies. As a woman its our first thought to blame ourselves for not being able to carry a baby. I think  to myself if I only knew I was rh negative then maybe if I had the shot when spotting everything  would be ok.  I guess everything happens for a reason and just hope next time I will be able to carry a healthy baby full term.
  • image alreeves:
    It has nothing to do with your miscarriage. I am RH negative. All it really means is for you is that you'll have to get a shot during your pregnancy ( I got mine @ 28 weeks when I had my glucose tolerance test) and then another one when the baby was born. It's pretty common actually.

    This. I was told by my OB yesterday that I will be getting my first shot at 28w and then again when the baby is born. Failing to do so can cause miscarriages in a future pregnancy. (This happened to my mom. They told her after her 2nd child she didn't need the shots and when she got pregnant with #3 she had a miscarriage)

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  • image JandJ-A:

    The Rh shot is important if the fetus and the mother are opposite blood types.  The mothers antibodies will attack the fetus because they think it is a virus.  It's also necessary to have this shot...but it sucks if you don't know that you are Rh negative, mostly because you don't find this out until it's too late.

    With my very first pregnancy (years ago), I found out that I was Rh negative.  After the loss of the baby, too.  They gave me the Rh shot and said that any pregnancies I had would require it.  Obviously, I'm pregnant now, and had the shot the day after I had started spotting and was told I will get another at 28 weeks and again after the birth. My doc said that I was lucky enough that the spotting happened the day before because the shot is necessary within 3 days of spotting.  Where is that info in all the books??????

    I had forgotten all about that shot being required.  If I had remembered, I would have made every effort to get it as soon as possible after the BFP and not two weeks later.  I'm so sorry that you've suffered this loss.  Thoughts and prayers and lots of hugs. 



    I have never heard of this in my life.  First of all, my cousin was a case study with this shot - if your first pregnancy has a mother with rh neg, and a child with positive, your child WILL BE FINE.  However, the shot prevents the body from creating antibodies that will affect FUTURE pregnancies, if the next child is positive.  I've always known my blood type, and last I checked, it's something they check for in your initial bloodwork, but even if you don't know, it is not going to cause you to just randomly m/c, unless you've had a previous pregnancy and didn't get the shot at that point.  That would be incredibly negligent of either the mother, or the OB.

    OP, it had nothing to do with your m/c.
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  • I am. I had a miscarriage early last year because of it (and I suspect one or two others, but I'm not 100% because I never POAS). So far, though, things are going very well with this pregnancy. I don't think I've ever been so happy with spending the day bent over the toilet. I'm sorry for your loss and wish you luck in the future, dear.
    February 19, 2010- BFP! March 14, 2010- M/C January 17, 2011- BFP! April 26th, 2011- It's a boy! Due September 20, 2011 May 2, 2011- Confirmed Gastroschisis August 7, 2011- Labor begins August 12, 2011- Max is born October 4, 2011- Max comes home!

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  • My sister and I are both Rh-. She has had 5 healthy pregnancies, 1 loss.  I am in the process of my 2nd healthy pregnancy.

     

     

    Edit: just saw your response. After my sisters loss (after 5 healthy pregnancies) she looked for any reason to blame herself. Don't, it makes something painful even more painful. It is a terribly sad thing that happened, but not your fault.

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  • image JamieS2006:
    image JandJ-A:


    I have never heard of this in my life.  First of all, my cousin was a case study with this shot - if your first pregnancy has a mother with rh neg, and a child with positive, your child WILL BE FINE.  However, the shot prevents the body from creating antibodies that will affect FUTURE pregnancies, if the next child is positive.  I've always known my blood type, and last I checked, it's something they check for in your initial bloodwork, but even if you don't know, it is not going to cause you to just randomly m/c, unless you've had a previous pregnancy and didn't get the shot at that point.  That would be incredibly negligent of either the mother, or the OB.

    OP, it had nothing to do with your m/c.

    Just because you've never heard of it, doesn't make it any less true.  This is info I had gotten from TWO OB/Gyn docs AND my primary physician.  I never said that she miscarried because of it.  I implied that I had lost MINE because of it.  I'm well aware that not all pregnancies are the same.  She asked a question and I just shared the info that I have been given - by MY doctors - just like everyone else.  Everyone's doctors are different and all have different opinions/beliefs.  The OP's m/c was more than likely just a random event.  Again, just because it happened to ME, doesn't mean that it was the case for her. 

    To the OP:  again, I am so sorry that you are going through this.  {{hugs}}

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  • The shot is only necessary if the father is positive. Me and my husband are both negative, so I don't need the shot.
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  • Julie.....I appreciate your kind words and for sharing your story. Knowing your 9wks pregnant brings me comfort in knowing it can happen for me. As for the girl who knew her blood type good for her.....most people I know dont know it and my miscarriage was at 5 weeks so it was too early for me even to have blood work. Thanks to all the other ladies for feedback....it def helps.
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    image JamieS2006:
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    I have never heard of this in my life.  First of all, my cousin was a case study with this shot - if your first pregnancy has a mother with rh neg, and a child with positive, your child WILL BE FINE.  However, the shot prevents the body from creating antibodies that will affect FUTURE pregnancies, if the next child is positive.  I've always known my blood type, and last I checked, it's something they check for in your initial bloodwork, but even if you don't know, it is not going to cause you to just randomly m/c, unless you've had a previous pregnancy and didn't get the shot at that point.  That would be incredibly negligent of either the mother, or the OB.

    OP, it had nothing to do with your m/c.

    Just because you've never heard of it, doesn't make it any less true.  This is info I had gotten from TWO OB/Gyn docs AND my primary physician.  I never said that she miscarried because of it.  I implied that I had lost MINE because of it.  I'm well aware that not all pregnancies are the same.  She asked a question and I just shared the info that I have been given - by MY doctors - just like everyone else.  Everyone's doctors are different and all have different opinions/beliefs.  The OP's m/c was more than likely just a random event.  Again, just because it happened to ME, doesn't mean that it was the case for her. 

    To the OP:  again, I am so sorry that you are going through this.  {{hugs}}

    I gotta go with Jamie (and science) on this one.

    The only way you can lose a pregnancy because of your RH status is if you have been exposed to RH+ blood in the past without being given a rhogam shot.  As a result of such exposure, you develop antibodies, which you will carry for life, and thus it is difficult to carry an Rh+ child.

    It is very rare to develop antibodies.  For most women, it happens if they had a miscarriage and did not know to go in and get the shot.  It happens less and less frequency as doctor care becomes more standard.  Also, doctors are required in most places to test your RH status as soon as they know you are KU and to communicate it to you.

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  • Obviously my point was missed...again.  I stated that it had happened to ME.  Not the OP.  And that the info I was given was from 3 (THREE) doctors; funny, I thought their degrees were based on Science.  I NEVER said that it happened that way with the OP.  IT HAPPENED TO ME!!!!!!!!!!!!  AND I HAD NEVER BEEN PREGNANT BEFORE THAT VERY FIRST ONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  • image JandJ-A:
    Obviously my point was missed...again.  I stated that it had happened to ME.  Not the OP.  And that the info I was given was from 3 (THREE) doctors; funny, I thought their degrees were based on Science.  I NEVER said that it happened that way with the OP.  IT HAPPENED TO ME!!!!!!!!!!!!  AND I HAD NEVER BEEN PREGNANT BEFORE THAT VERY FIRST ONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This is probably beating a dead horse, but from what you posted, it seems like maybe you misunderstood the doctors?  Did they actually say that you had a m/c because you are Rh-?  From what you said your doc(s) said, it was good that you came in and got the shot when you did because they need to give it within a certain time frame so your body doesn't mount an immune response.  Not that if you had gone in earlier, it would have prevented you from miscarrying.  Going and getting a Rhogam shot right after you get a BFP isn't going to do much for you.  The Rhogam antibodies don't stick around forever, so if you had bleeding, you'd probably have to get another shot anyway.  Or maybe I'm totally misunderstanding. 

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  • It is beating a dead horse.  And yes, the docs all said that.  My sister was with me when the OB told me a few weeks ago, too.  I did lose my very first because of the Rh thing, but no one could really explain how; just that "it happens."  Whatever.  And like I said a few times, I'm sure the OP's m/c wasn't because of the Rh.  Just that mine was.  This time around, things seem to be going smoothly for me.  My case just seems to be one of those rarities, I guess.
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  • I am RH negative as well and started spotting last week.  When I contacted my doctor they said I had 72 hours from the time I started spotting to get the shot.  I  went in and got the shot and am no longer spotting and have an ultrasound on Monday to make sure everything is ok.
  • I am A- and my husband is A+.  We recently had a miscarriage and I received my RH shot after my D&E procedure.  I received an information sheet from the hospital explaining that Sometimes the baby's blood may get into the mother's bloodstream while she is pregnant or during delivery and that her body tries to fight off the baby's RH positive blood cells with "antibodies".  These antibodies may affect the unborn child by causing blood disease, brain damage, or death.
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  • I'm Rh neg and I had a healthy pregnancy with a healthy baby at the end, an early miscarriage during my second pregnancy, and (so far) a healthy pregnancy now with my third. Unless you've been exposed to Rh positive blood in the past (like a previous pregnancy or miscarriage with an Rh+ baby), the Rh factor has nothing to do with your miscarriage. Sometimes they just happen. In fact, they happen in about 25% of pregnancies and in the vast majority of cases, they are due to a completely random chromosomal defect that absolutely nothing can prevent or stop.

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