2nd Trimester

Dog owners..

What breed do you have, or what breed would you recommend?

DH and I are looking for something on the small side (40lbs or less), that, of course, is good with kids.

We have a decent sized yard, but the dog would most likely be in the house quite a bit. Also, we spend a lot of time in the summer on camping and fishing trips, so we don't want anything too tiny!

Any suggestions? We're looking to buy/adopt sometime within the next month or so.

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Re: Dog owners..

  • I would strongly recommend not worrying so much about breed, but the actual dog. Go through a rescue who knows their dogs and can tell you exactly how a particular dog will be w/ your family. You can find one that you already know is great with babies/kids and they can match something to your needs that is a perfect fit.

    Please, whatever you do, do NOT buy a dog from a pet store or a breeder (as 99.9% of breeders aren't reputable AT ALL).

  • I love my boston and my pug, but Boston's have a TON of energy.  I would suggest a pug any day. They have a good temperment, and were bred originally to be companion dogs.  Every pug I've been around has been great!  The only get to be around 20-25 pounds though, so that's a little smaller than what you were saying.
  • oh, and I didn't answer the first part... I have 3 dogs; all mixes. 1 is an Australian Shepherd/Rottweiler mix (soooooo sweet and great w/ kids), another is a great dane/smooth coated collie mix and the 3rd we really have no idea whatsoever. They're all incredibly sweet, not a mean bone in their bodies, you can do ANYTHING to them and they don't care and just want to be loved on.

  • My aunt/uncle/cousins have a springer spaniel that is so well-behaved and loves going on their fishing trips (they live in Minnesota and my uncle is a HUGE fisherman). She kind of looks like this (I don't have a photo of their actual dog)...

    image

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  • We have beagles. I'd be hard-pressed to get anything else within their size range. They are playful, loving and great with kids.

    Down side: they need ALOT of exercise b/c of their propensity to become obese, they can be pretty stubborn and if you don't train them young, they can be barkers.

    Good luck in your search.

  • We have a cocker spaniel and she is PERFECT.  Neither one of us liked the breed when we started looking around, but when we saw her we fell in love and now we couldn't be happier.  She is GREAT with kids, and is IMO pretty much the perfect dog.  The only problem she has is that she has anxiety problems so if we leave her alone we have to crate her or she'll chew up whatever is closest.  She knows she's being bad when she does it because as soon as we get home she goes into apology mode but she just can't help it.  The one good thing about her anxiety is that we can go anywhere and have her with us and she won't leave a 3 ft. radius of us - she sticks soooo close which is awesome.  The only time she has ever run off is when there was a squirrel that got a little too close - it entered her 3 ft. circle and once she's on the hunt it's hard to break it.  She is wonderful - I would highly highly recommend the breed.

  • We have a beagle that is awesome. He seriously doesn't know he is a dog. My nephew will pull on his tail and ears and he just looks at me like "get this kid off" but he doesn't do anything! He stays inside about 80% of the time and just sleeps on a pillow bed in the living room. They shed pretty bad if you don't wash and brush them regularly, but we brush him 3 times a week, wash him once every 2 weeks and don't have a problem at all.
  • image JCM052707:

    Please, whatever you do, do NOT buy a dog from a pet store or a breeder (as 99.9% of breeders aren't reputable AT ALL).

     

    ...and, I agree with this.  We got both of our dogs from a rescue.

  • We have a beagle and that is the only kind of dog DH has ever had. Beagles are really cute, but they also tend to be more of a hunting dog which may be great for camping and fishing trips, but they also tend to let there noises lead them. You just have to make sure your beagle is well trained, just like any other breed.
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  • I have a border collie mix that I adopted 10 years ago.  She is so great.  She weighs about 40 pounds and loves the outdoors.  I think back in her "prime" she would have been good with kids.  She is getting older now but still is very patient when DS decides he wants to climb all over her.

    I also have a rat terrier mix that weighs 11 pounds that I adopted 4 years ago.  He is a little too wirey and doesn't seem like he would be too into a camping trip.  He's a good lap dog, but he mostly runs from DS.

    I'm a huge animal lover and I do recommend adopting.  There are so many wonderful dogs out there that need homes.  And from my experience I have always found that "mix" dogs turn out to be better dogs than full-bred.
    Okay, I'll get off my soapbox now.....  : ) 

  • image rommelea:

    We have a cocker spaniel and she is PERFECT.  Neither one of us liked the breed when we started looking around, but when we saw her we fell in love and now we couldn't be happier.  She is GREAT with kids, and is IMO pretty much the perfect dog. 

    And here is a perfect example of why breed, in terms of a just a good family pet, means absolutely nothing. I was attacked (unprovoked) by 2 cocker spaniels who were about tohave a baby added to the family. SCARY! There are good and bad dogs in ALL breeds, but I can tell you one thing, it's hard for me to think of cocker spaniels in a good light now.

    This is a huge reason it would be beneficial to you, the OP, to look at a rescue group who knows their dogs' personalities, etc.

  • We have two Pembroke Corgis.

    Pros of the breed: great personality, normally great with kids, intelligent/learn quickly, should weigh less than 30 lbs, likes to be indoors most of the time but likes to take walks/play outside

    Cons: shedding, shedding, shedding, nipping and herding behavior as a puppy (has to be trained)

     

  • I have 2 dogs. one corgi mix & one chow/shepard mix. I can honestly say that everyone that I come in contact with who adopts/rescues corgi mixes are very happy with the temperment. Mine (her name is Pumpkin) is amazing with kids, she actually sat still while my cousins year old kid played school with her and stuck stickers all over her... she loves the outdoors. she loves to swim and she is very well mannered. I cannot say enough about the corgi breed. Good Luck!
  • I have two toy poodles. They are great small dogs.  One weighs 17 lbs and the other is only 4 lbs.  They dont shed and are okay with being in the house for most of the day.
  • The thought of getting a new dog a few months before having a baby...yech. Just my opinion though. We have 2 rescue dogs, one is a Jack Russell mix and the other we got back in June, she's a little doxie/chihuahua mix. They are both full of energy and require a lot of time. If we did not currently have dogs, I definitely wouldn't consider getting one any time soon. Especially if they're going to be inside dogs and need to be house trained. Both of ours 'came house-trained'...neither were. Just a thought, make sure this is really what you want to do! Good luck though, defintiely go through a shelter though, so many wonderful dogs out there!!
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  • I have a Husky/Lab mix - he is fairly large - well above the 40lb mark you are looking at.  He is very playful and good around people.  I had a Samoyed growing up and she was really good with kids. Like pp said - if you go to a rescue they usually know the dog's temperment pretty well and can tell you if it would be good with kids and you have the added bonus of saving a puppy. 
    "When one of your dreams come true, you begin to look at the others more carefully." IAmPregnant Ticker
  • I have a Lab as well as a Shih-tzu/Maltese Mix.  The thing I love about the Shih-Mal is that she doesn't shed.  AND she is a better camper than the lab if you can believe that!  They're not as "girly" as you might think, she's a tough cookie!
  • we have an eskimo dog. he is a great dog with kids. he was a rescue. a friend of my husband has one and he is great with kids as well. 

    here is photo to show you his size.

    image 

  • image MidwestTexan:

    My aunt/uncle/cousins have a springer spaniel that is so well-behaved and loves going on their fishing trips (they live in Minnesota and my uncle is a HUGE fisherman). She kind of looks like this (I don't have a photo of their actual dog)...

    image

    We have 2 springer spaniels!   They have a lot of energy and get around 45 lbs.   They are awesome with kids and incredibly loyal!  Super friendly and great hunting dogs.  They are also highly intelligent and easily trained.   I agree with pp about not getting a dog in a pet store.  We got our dogs through a breeder and she was terrific - make sure you do some research on where you get your dog.

     

  • I recommend a Sheltie. They're easily trained, good with people, active but not excessively, and cute as can be. They are furry and need to be brushed regularly but it's not annoying.

    I agree with others, a rescue or adoption is the way to go. GL!

  • I agree it doesn't really matter too much on the breed every dog has it's own personality. Also it depends on the training and the socializing it has. I would recommend going to the pound there are a lot of dogs that need a loving home. Our lab mix was 5 months old when we got him from the pound and he is very mellow and sweet. Our other dog is a Louisanna Catahoula Leopard and she's a sweet heart but a acts like a spolied princess ( very whinny, our fault).?
    Another thing I might add you might want to wait a while after the baby before getting a puppy. I can't imagine having two at once. Puppies need a lot of attention like babies.
  • I also vote for beagles! Ours is fabulous... she is a 13" and is now 25 pounds, fully grown. Ditto those who mentioned that they can be loud. But she's super gentle around curious kids; and if they're scared of her, she just ignores them and does her own thing.

    Of course, if you're going to get a puppy as opposed to an adult dog - especially now - make sure you have a TON of time to devote to training and socializing it over the next few months before the baby is born. Otherwise, don't be surprised if it develops behaviors you don't like when your baby comes and you don't have as much time and attention to give to the puppy.

    And oh, we got our dog from a breeder even though apparently some pp'ers would call that irresponsible. It's a personal decision.

  • I always grew up with big dogs and didn't really like small dogs. Til I discovered Yorkies. I have one and she is the best thing in the world! My mom fell in love with her and got two of her own. 4 of my friends have yorkies and 3 have small children that they are EXCELLENT with. Ours goes camping and to the lake and out in the snow with us all the time. She is awesome and so much fun to be around!
  • Ditto pp that it depends more on the dog than the actual breed.

    But as a breed, Bichon Frise are good family dogs and on the smaller side.

    Animalplnaet.com has some great info. And here's the link to the bichon frise page. (That is a terrible pic of the breed, though!)

  • image Adriamichelle83:
    The thought of getting a new dog a few months before having a baby...yech. Just my opinion though. We have 2 rescue dogs, one is a Jack Russell mix and the other we got back in June, she's a little doxie/chihuahua mix. They are both full of energy and require a lot of time. If we did not currently have dogs, I definitely wouldn't consider getting one any time soon. Especially if they're going to be inside dogs and need to be house trained. Both of ours 'came house-trained'...neither were. Just a thought, make sure this is really what you want to do! Good luck though, defintiely go through a shelter though, so many wonderful dogs out there!!

    I totally agree w/ this. We got our 3rd in Oct (not knowing when/if I'd get pregnant ever) and even still (and he's not really a total puppy) I have thoughts of OMG Riley's still so new and we have 3 dogs. (Didn't want 3, but I foudn him at my barn and couldn't take him to a shelter, he was too sweet).

    This is another good reason to go with a dog from a rescue that is a little older (puppies are A LOT of work, I mean A TON!!!) that would be a good match and already have some training, etc.  Often times, rescue dogs that are bit older with good temperments have a really easy time just fitting right in.

  • I have a chocolate lab and a yellow lab.  Both of them are great with Emily, and has been since she has been born.  She can do whatever she wants to them, and they won't do anything back. 
  • image MidwestTexan:

    My aunt/uncle/cousins have a springer spaniel that is so well-behaved and loves going on their fishing trips (they live in Minnesota and my uncle is a HUGE fisherman). She kind of looks like this (I don't have a photo of their actual dog)...

    image

    I had a springer as a kid, and he was wonderful!

  • image JCM052707:
    I was attacked (unprovoked) by 2 cocker spaniels who were about tohave a baby added to the family. SCARY! There are good and bad dogs in ALL breeds, but I can tell you one thing, it's hard for me to think of cocker spaniels in a good light now.

    This is a huge reason it would be beneficial to you, the OP, to look at a rescue group who knows their dogs' personalities, etc.

    Wow - that's horrible.  I agree with your original post - you have to look at the dog - it has a lot to do with training, and their personality in general.  However, this is the first I've heard of a cocker being agressive!!! Usually the only complaints are ear infections and potty training issues!  I'm sorry you had such a bad experience with them Sad

  • image MrsDuncan:

     have as much time and attention to give to the puppy.

    And oh, we got our dog from a breeder even though apparently some pp'ers would call that irresponsible. It's a personal decision.

    It's not irresponsible if you NEEDED a particular breed from a certain breeder, but as a family pet? No. There are a few handful of breeders that are actually good in this country. They have show dogs, titles on their dogs they breed, every health screen known to man, tons of clauses in their contracts, breeder VERY FEW litters, have waiting lists months to years long, etc.  Like I said, not many breeders meet all of this criteria and more and it's rare someone needs a dog like that as a family pet.

  • Just wanted to chime in-- in the case you may want to buy a pure bred dog. There are pro's to adoption and pro's to getting a dog from a breeder. ?If you do your research and find a good breeder (one who is local in their regional AKC, can provide proof of heritage, etc.) its worth going to visit and meeting the dogs. ?Ask to talk to the vet they use and ask for references. ?We have two pure bred dogs and they are wonderful (though not the size you are looking for). ?Breeders can give you a family history of health problems and a good breeder can certify through their vet that the puppy parents do not have some of the chronic conditions that can plague many breeds. ?They can also breed for temperment, meaning that they choose to breed dogs that display good characteristics and will not breed aggressive dogs. ?

    A good breeder will also stay in touch after you get a puppy. ?We were able to call ours and ask for names of trainers, help finding local AKC clubs and ways to socialize our puppy and we could call when he wasn't feeling well or up at night to find out more about what calmed him and what he liked to help ease his transition.?

    We have wonderful pets and I am in no way against adoption. But I also know from experience if you do your research getting a dog from a good breeder can be really rewarding.?

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