Parenting

What happens when you refuse dialysis?

My grandfather's kidneys are failing and he's refusing dialysis.  What's next?  Be honest please.

Re: What happens when you refuse dialysis?

  • your blood get toxic and I think you will start to retain fluids and you can go into shock  (I think thats what they call it) and then you can die.  :( Im sorry
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  • DH's grandmother went through that. ?She stopped dialysis, signed on with hospice, slipped into a coma, and was gone in a couple days. ?It was very peaceful. ?

    I'm sorry. ?

    .
  • So basically a slow painful death?  Stubborn old man.

  • it depends on the person but he should request hospice care.  They are angels.  Its all about pain managment please get him some hospice help.
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  • :-( ?I'm sorry. ?Has he been sick for a long time? ?Maybe he just wants not to be in pain anymore? ?I'm sorry; it's so hard to watch a loved one suffer.?
  • He is already in the hospital since last Friday.  He had gall bladder surgery - Monday will be two weeks ago.  Friday he had to go back to the hospital because he had a fever and was unresponsive.  He was immediately taken to another hospital for emergency surgery - he had an infection due to a tear in his esophagus from vomiting.  It was too soft to repair and they put some T thing in it and planned to repair it when it healed up.  They have kept him intubated and knocked out since waking him periodically to check his neurological function.  His kidneys were bad but he was okay earlier this week.  Now they are failing again.  One doc says that one round of dialysis will get him going, another says no, but either way, he refuses to do it.  He started shaking his head no furiously and his blood pressure went way up.
  • Nobody can say for sure based onthe info you provided--and nobody else's experience indicates what your grandpa's might be like.

    We wnt through it twice in the last year of my granpa's life--he was 95 when he dies.  The first time, he had an antibiotic infection inside the bones of his foot so they gave three weeks of IV antibiotics.  They should not have kept him on antibiotics so long--they should have used surgical methods to remove the infection at that point (they eventually did.)  In the meantime, all of the antibiotics were toxic to his kidneys and caused him to go into kidney failure.  He refused dialysis.  But because there was a know, isolated reason for the kidney failure and it was mild, even without dialysis, he made a full recovery.

    Then, about 9 months later, he his body started to shut down simply because he was old.  He had congestive heart failure and his body filled with fluids, cuasing kidney failure.  He could not over come that--it was just his time to pass.  He refused dialysis and was released to hospice care.  He was kept on morphine and passed away within 4 days.  He was not uncomfortable at all because  his pain was carefully managed by very kind and caring nurses.

     So we faced it twice with two totally different outcomes.  It could go either way depending on why it's happening and what else is being done for him.

    Not sure why your grandpa is sick but I hope you have equally kind and caring people around you to help him though it!

  • Oh Kitty, I am so sorry. 
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  • He's 90 with nothing otherwise wrong with him.  He's, I guess, pre-diabetic, he's taken sugar pills for the longest time.  Other than being a stubborn old man with a broken heart for the last nine years after my grandma died...
  • image kittycarr:
    He's 90 with nothing otherwise wrong with him.  He's, I guess, pre-diabetic, he's taken sugar pills for the longest time.  Other than being a stubborn old man with a broken heart for the last nine years after my grandma died...

    Your grandpa sounds a lot like my grandpa--he was in decent shape right up until the end when everything failed at once simply because he was old. (He did have some chronic health conditions, too, but those were well managed, like your grandpa)   But, like your grandpa, he lived for years (21) on his own after my grandma died.  As I said, we dealt with this once where the kidney failure was induced by medication, once an alternative therapy was found for my grandpa, he bounced right back.  I hope that is the same for your grandpa!

  • Well, as much as no one likes to see anyone die, I actually hope that he does.  And I cannot believe I just said that.  But he's old and my cousin that lives with him that is supposed to be taking care of him (companionship, etc) is not doing so and he won't live anywhere else.  He's not right in his head but only because he's irritated with having to strap on an oxygen mask so he does not.  Every fall, he disappears.  He's been found in NY, MD, he gets further north each trip.  He claims he was visiting a relative. When he went to NY, he said he was visiting me.  I don't live in NY.  He'd never know who I was if you stood me in front of him.  I told my aunt the first time this happened three years ago that he and my grandma used to take vacations in the fall and subconsciously that might be how he gets out in the first place.  He says he's going to 7-11 or to get fresh air and then we don't see him for several days to a week at a time.
  • DH's gpaw refused his dialysis.  He had many other things also (congestive heart failure. diabetes)  he lived almost 3 months after stopping dialysis.  They didn't really expect him to make it that long.  I'm sorry.
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  • image kittycarr:

    So basically a slow painful death?  Stubborn old man.

     I'm sorry your family is facing this. My grandfather made the same choice.

     

    Not usually a bad way to go. Medications can manage symptoms like itching, but most patients pass into a state where they sort of halluncinate around pleasant things from their past before slipping away. There is no real pain involved; it's typically very peaceful.

     

    My BIL is an er physician and he often says he'd choose kidney failure for himself over most other ways of dying. And he has seen them all.

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